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Women-in-Peril or Final Girls?

Representing Women in Gothic and Horror Cinema. The representation of female protagonists has been a central tenant in both Gothic and Horror cinema. In the Hollywood Gothic films of the s, the heroine is the primary focus as she navigates key tropes of the genre, including the exploration of the old dark house and the investigating of sinister marital secrets.

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These Gothic conventions have been revived and reworked recently in contemporary cinema with the release of Crimson Peak Horror cinema has also been characterised by the portrayal of its female protagonists. The s Universal horror films typically feature the endangered woman who is terrorised by the monster or villain. Indeed, as Rhona J. When comparing these historic representations of female protagonists in Gothic and horror cinema, one can identify many similarities between the two genres or modes in respect to their portrayal of women. This risk — which is normally made against her life — comes from the villain or antagonist conventionally gendered as male.

Numéros en texte intégral

And Gothic has been called horror: Mark Jancovich points out how the s Hollywood Gothics were also understood as horror films at their time of release Jancovich, Yet there are also significant differences between Gothic and horror. The two modes or genres can be distinguished by variations in how the central female protagonist is depicted.


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Where the Gothic emphasises suspicion, suspense and mystery, the horror film showcases blood, torture and gore. Gothic and horror also differ in their presumed target audience.

Intro to Graduate Film and Media Studies

This risk — which is normally made against her life — comes from the villain or antagonist conventionally gendered as male. And Gothic has been called horror: Mark Jancovich points out how the s Hollywood Gothics were also understood as horror films at their time of release Jancovich Yet, there are also significant differences between Gothic and horror.

Film Focus: A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night () – CINELªSTE

The two modes or genres can be distinguished by variations in how the central female protagonist is depicted. Where the Gothic emphasises suspicion, suspense and mystery, the horror film showcases blood, torture and gore. Gothic and horror also differ in their presumed target audience. Conversely, the spectatorship for horror has been characterised as adolescent and male Williams ; Clover ; Creed This special issue of Revenant represents a selection of the rich, thought-provoking and original papers delivered at the event which all, in their own ways, muse upon the various incarnations of the women in Gothic and horror films, be they witches, vampires, possessed teenagers or young brides.

What all the articles presented in this special issue have in common is their focus upon the visual medium: predominantly the feature length film. This focus speaks to the larger project the conference, and this issue, are contributing towards: Gothic Feminism. This research group, based at the University of Kent, hosted its first conference in May which inaugurated our intention to explore specifically the historic and contemporaneous on-screen representations of the Gothic heroine.

Princeton University Library Catalog

This special issue of Revenant concentrates on the female protagonists of Gothic and horror more broadly, and the spooky, abject and frightful places they inhabit. At the heart of all the articles you shall read here is the question of feminism — the complexity of which is wonderfully outlined by Aldana Reyes in his introduction to this collection.


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What do these women-in-peril or Final Girls really represent? How should we interpret them?

‘The Exorcist’ Literature Review: Paternal Absence and Patriarchal Punishment

What do they say about the contexts within which they were made? It may be impossible to say for certain but you will find some illuminating and, appropriately enough, haunting suggestions within these pages. All the attendees and presenters at the Gothic Feminism conferences, including colleagues who have contributed to the formation and continuation of the ongoing project. All the authors who contributed to this special issue and permitted us the privilege of reading their fascinating research.

Berenstein, Rhona J.

Clover, Carol J. Freeland, Cynthia A. Murphy, Bernice M.