Get PDF Rocket Girls (Rocket Girls, Book 1)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Rocket Girls (Rocket Girls, Book 1) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Rocket Girls (Rocket Girls, Book 1) book. Happy reading Rocket Girls (Rocket Girls, Book 1) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Rocket Girls (Rocket Girls, Book 1) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Rocket Girls (Rocket Girls, Book 1) Pocket Guide.

Throughout, the 11 members alternate between hanging out alone and singing together, wandering on mountains and chilling in a beautifully decorated room. She has previously interned for Sixth Tone and Shanghai Daily. Your email address will not be published. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Newsletter Signup Go beyond the headlines to truly understand China.

Sign up today! TechBuzz China is going to China! As part of our inaugural invite-only TechBuzz China Investor Trip for public market investors taking place right after Golden Week, we will be hosting live meetups. Friday Song Mandopop Mandopop Month. In defense of the Yenching Academy Previous post. Related articles. Friday Song: Champion by Jason Derulo ft. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Panda hugger or panda slugger? Our Presidential Election China Tracker.

Meet the Forgotten 'Rocket Girls' Who Helped NASA Reach the Stars

The story of the rocket girls is generally a happy one, though. The author explains how the women helped NASA put people and rovers and satellites into space, describing how women were involved from the 's to today. She does so through interesting biographies of the women and an easy to understand history of rocket development no maths for the reader to struggle with. Some of the spectacular successes and failures of rocket history are explained, including information I did not know before. In the back of the book are extensive notes and an index.

I highly recommend 'Rise of the Rocket Girls'! View all 4 comments. Mar 20, Erin rated it did not like it Shelves: books-i-own , audio-books , did-not-finish. Audiobook narrated by Erin Bennett 9h 45 min 49 seconds Decided to abandon at 3hours 21 minutes for two reasons; First, it was incredibly researched, but too much backstories. Second, the narrator read off the chapters very robotically. Conclusion: Good intentions but it just wasn't for me. View 2 comments. One of the biggest omissions of the modern initiative to get girls and women involved in STEM is highlighting that they have long contributed materially to advancements in these fields.

It is unfortunate that social attitudes changed and for a time they were discouraged from studying the topics resulting in a waning presence. The larger and more unforgivable sin is that their presence and contributions have been actively or passively ignored in the narratives we are told. When the fields hide th One of the biggest omissions of the modern initiative to get girls and women involved in STEM is highlighting that they have long contributed materially to advancements in these fields. When the fields hide these contributions, girls and young women are robbed of relatable heroes and icons to pull them back in, social attitudes be damned.

This fascinating story is a bold attempt to address these omissions. It tells the history of a remarkable collection of women who were not merely present in the story of our ascension to the stars, but significantly responsible for it. There are two aspects to the book.

Panda hugger or panda slugger? Our 2020 Presidential Election China Tracker

One focuses on the women and the unique opportunities fostered by Macie Roberts and then subsequently by Helen Ling. They actively sought out talented women to fill the roles of "computers" at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at a time when there were few similar opportunities for women with these skills and inclinations. The culture was generally positive and accepting and appears to have evolved to continue to be so today. The other aspect of the book is a tour of the highs and lows of the advancements of human space exploration.

These women were there, but the wins and losses were incredible, tragic and shared with the country and the world.


  • C: A Reference Manual;
  • interphases and mesophases in polymer crsytallization?
  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Molecular Genetics, Biology, Diagnosis, and Management.
  • Rocket Girls: Rock It (Rocket Girls) by Housuke Nojiri.
  • Ada 2005 Ref. Manual - Lang., Std. Libs.!

This is the impact these people, men and women, had on our species and it is gobsmacking in the telling. Ultimately, with role models such as Barbara Paulson, Sylvia Miller and Sue Finley who has a large role in the recently successful Juno project to Jupiter , we don't need to invite girls back. STEM isn't a man's world that we are inviting them to participate in. They have always been there kicking ass and making it happen. It's important we hear their names so they don't continue to get Rosalind Franklined by history.

View 1 comment. Sitting at her desk The garter belt was uncomfortable, often digging into a woman's stomach and legs. Pantyhose came about in the late s when Ethel Boone Gant had had enough. While Barbara didn't intend to start wearing miniskirts, there was a new style she wanted to try. While trying out their new fashion-forward outfits, they were also debugging programs. A computer bug was a problem in the code. The term had been coined by Thomas Edis Sitting at her desk The term had been coined by Thomas Edison and then popularized by navy rear admiral Grace Hopper From space missions and pantyhose to pantsuits and computer bugs, then a roundtrip to marriage and space missions?

Has strong potential to be an eye-opener for women's role in NASA, but instead turns superficial in attempts to cover too much information. Super fascinating topic to highlight these amazing women; unfortunately I didn't super love the writing style and slogged through this. I've had this one for a while and finally decided to tackle it.

Navigation menu

I was a little hesitant because it had the potential of being dry, since I'm so not a science geek. But I completely enjoyed this. It was a wonderful read. The women in this book were such great examples not only to all women, but also to the men in their world. This book covers a group of women who were hired by the Jet Propulsion Lab as number crunchers. IBM kept coming up with ginormous calculators to do the math, but they were ne I've had this one for a while and finally decided to tackle it. IBM kept coming up with ginormous calculators to do the math, but they were never reliable, so these women led the way.

Often times, they would have to leave their job when they were fired for being pregnant, but they would always come back.

I thought the author did a great job and not bogging this down with the scientific details that would mean nothing to me. She kept her focus on the women and their lives, both personal and professional. The computer science details seemed a little to technical for me towards the end, but I was still fascinated with how much they have evolved into what we have today. View all 5 comments. Not that I haven't taken courses in those subjects. Although, I would have liked a few more diagrams, the author does a pretty good job of conveying what these ladies were doing, which was light years beyond my abilities.

I'm very appreciative of what these exceptional young women had to deal with in the 40's, 50's, 60's, 70's and beyond, being more pioneers than radical rebels; they were outstanding in their field and deserve more recognition. I have heard about these women at JPL for years and am so glad to have the opportunity to learn more about them.

SPOTLIGHTS

A group of woman called human computers was responsible for the math involved. The women had degrees in math, physics, chemistry and engineering but were having trouble finding a job after graduation until JPL hired them i I have heard about these women at JPL for years and am so glad to have the opportunity to learn more about them. The women had degrees in math, physics, chemistry and engineering but were having trouble finding a job after graduation until JPL hired them in the and 50s.

Holt provides the reader a look into the lives of these remarkable women as well as the history of rocket science. Remember all the math was done by hand in the days before computers. The book is easy to read and full of fascinating details about discoveries that these women made. I noted that the women continued their education via Caltech courses going on to obtain advance degrees in engineering and computer science. Of course they did not receive the same pay. Holt also said women have more opportunities in science and engineering at JPL than any other public or private facility, primarily due to the high standard of work by women in this story.

Erin Bennett does a good job narrating the book. How could these brilliant mathematicians be subjected to Miss Guided Missile beauty pageants? How could they be qualified to work with an exclusive rocket research group yet be disallowed to interview for engineering positions? How could these women be expected to pack up and leave when they married and had children?

I was fascinated with these women, their work and their contributions to science but I needed a strong voice of injustice. Instead I got, "Barbara might not be the prettiest girl in How could these brilliant mathematicians be subjected to Miss Guided Missile beauty pageants?

Instead I got, "Barbara might not be the prettiest girl in the lab, but she was sociable and easy to work with.


  1. See a Problem?.
  2. Leave a Reply.;
  3. Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars!
  4. Deleuze Reframed: A Guide for the Arts Student (Contemporary Thinkers Reframed).
  5. Chinese Handwriting Recognition: An Algorithmic Perspective?
  6. The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia (2nd Edition);
  7. I want a do-over. I would love to see a retelling of the story of the Rocket Girls authored by Hope Jahren. May 09, Just A. This book was really frustrating, and I don't think I was the target audience. I feel like the target audience is maybe teenagers who are generally in favour of science, but know very, very little about history or NASA.

    Hopefully some of them enjoy it. From my perspective, it was trying to cover too much ground in way too short a book, and ended up with a very superficial look at a bunch of stuff I already knew about. The stronger sections of the book were probably about JPL's missile days, which This book was really frustrating, and I don't think I was the target audience. The stronger sections of the book were probably about JPL's missile days, which had a lot more detail about what the women were action doing.

    By the end, it just talked about what projects women worked on, with not much on their contributions, and kept getting sidetracked on unrelated NASA projects. There were also so many different women in play that I had a difficult time keeping track of them, and felt the book would have been better served by picking two or three who had long careers and sticking with them.

    Or picking a shorter era and focusing in more detail on what the work involved. The prose wasn't great, and the whole thing badly needed an editor. Battled between 3 - 4 stars, Final 3. I might be a little too close to the overall topic of this book to be completely astounded by it. Goodness, these pioneers worked at the JPL, that's huge.

    I just mean the early days of computers. Mine mids Since I was working for a large corporation at the time, I even got to hear and meet the dynamic, Grace Hooper, twice. In full naval uniform. Anyway, ba Battled between 3 - 4 stars, Final 3. Anyway, back to the book, when the author is covering facts about the space program, etc.

    However, the was way too much info about their appearance, clothes, love life, etc. Why all this, and from a female author. Very disappointed that she felt compelled to add these details, especially in Loved how this read more like a book than an autobiography. Also loved learning about this amazing women that helped pave the way for future generations!

    They were so inspiring and I loved getting little bits about their every day life and family as well. Loved reading about women making a deliberate effort to hire more women into an unwelcoming field. Plus, there's a lot about math and coding for a non-technical book. But also, it's JPL, and they're exploring the solar system, which is as cool as it gets. I really enjoyed the interweaving of professional and personal events and anecdotes. If you're a fan of end notes, these are especially rich. Library copy. JPL was founded in the early 's.

    The women were "computers", not "engineers". They did all the calculations for the early experiments in rocket design, moving on to work on designing missles, and then spacecraft. Initially they did all their work with paper, graph paper, and pencil. Then they used mechanical calculators, and slide rules. As the years passed they became software developers, working on the design of the missions and writing the code for Voyager, Galileo, Cassini, the Mars rovers, and many early pioneering spacecraft, and the Deep Space Network which is a network of tracking stations around the earth that pick up signals from spacecraft.

    This is an amazing story, a great story for everyone to know, but especially for those who, like me, were girls who dreamed of space. Women doing math and science and computer science, way back in the old days! So exciting! Thank you, Liz, for getting this book for me! This was a delightful and fascinating read about the women "computers" who helped build the space program in the late 40s, into the 50s, and through to today. We follow a few key women throughout the decades, following the progression of the space program and the role of women in the sciences.

    The author throws in some fun anecdotes, like when a couple of the women decided it was acceptable to finally wear pant suits, along with the struggles many of these women had in the early days of getting This was a delightful and fascinating read about the women "computers" who helped build the space program in the late 40s, into the 50s, and through to today.

    The author throws in some fun anecdotes, like when a couple of the women decided it was acceptable to finally wear pant suits, along with the struggles many of these women had in the early days of getting married, getting pregnant, and facing the choice of leaving a job you loved or attempt the fine balancing act of being a working mother.

    Highly inspiring! Just enough science is covered to give the reader an idea of what's going on in the profession without being overwhelming. Having previously read The Astronaut Wives Club, this was an awesome book to get a women's perspective of the space program from a totally different angle. Okay, so I'm definitely biased because I had the good fortune to meet the author and the majority of the women featured in the book.

    'Rise of the Rocket Girls' (US 2016): Book Excerpt

    This is such an inspiring story, for women everywhere, especially in the sciences. I love JPL, female empowerment and space history so really this was the perfect book for me! I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in history of JPL and wanting to learn about the untold story of female programming pioneers. I tried. I really, really tried. But when a book is supposed to show light on women who history has hidden, a book that I was so excited to read, becomes a sexist shit show, there's only so much a person can take. Every morning she carefully selected dresses and skirts, wore high heels, and always, no matter how hot the day was, put on stockings.

    Barbara was playful with her clothing, but not at work. I picked up this book specifically to see what Barbara would wear! Her grip on the pencil often made her hand perspire, leaving pucker marks across the graph paper. Probably useful information for Jeopardy! The writing is horrible. I've always believed that scientists and the humanities should always pair up when creating a piece of nonfiction work. We can help! More importantly, the women showcased in the book are important but are presented as objectified pieces.

    And it's a shame. They deserve better. Now that I know the names of the women who helped launch the rocket program, Google will help me research them to their full intelligent capacity than this book ever could. The women are fascinating but the book leaves much to be desired. Simplistic prose; choppy, erratic organization; lack of substance and an overall weak writing style all contribute to a lackluster portrayal of a very dynamic time in both American and women's history.

    The frequent brushing off of opportunities to discuss social issues of the time e. Finishing was a struggle. I started crying in chapter 2 and then started tearing up every few pages. My mom was an engineer so the book hits close to home. The story is so inspiring and I wish I could hand it to every young girl out there.

    I just love this book! Really interesting book about a group of scientists I knew almost nothing about going in. As a modern feminist with a love of science and history, this book hit me in the feels as much as the mind. I really enjoyed learning about the evolution of computers from people to devices in the history of rocket making in the US. When Natalia Holt, scientific researcher and writer, and her husband were searching for a name for their baby daughter, they googled the name Eleanor Frances.

    Who was this woman and were there other women working at NASA during this time? Two births emerged: baby daughter Eleanor, and a research project about the women beh When Natalia Holt, scientific researcher and writer, and her husband were searching for a name for their baby daughter, they googled the name Eleanor Frances.

    Two births emerged: baby daughter Eleanor, and a research project about the women behind the rocket science that sent Americans into space. Today there are many innovations which are taken for granted: digitization, hand-held devices that contain chunks of our personal lives and are able to access the world, and more notably news of space stations where astronauts come and go, and the rockets that propel them are part of everyday life.

    Not that long ago, these were the dreams of science fiction and fantasy writers, but there were many engineers and scientists who had visions of making space travel a reality, and with rare exception almost all of these dreamers were men who worked on the actual projects. There were women, who were not engineers but had strong math skills and were hired as human calculators during the s and s at JPL.

    These women were not doing simple sums, but complex calculations which produced pages of measurements, and numerous calculation tables vital to, ".