Download e-book Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Powerful Tools for a Modern Knowledge-Based Economy

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Powerful Tools for a Modern Knowledge-Based Economy file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Powerful Tools for a Modern Knowledge-Based Economy book. Happy reading Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Powerful Tools for a Modern Knowledge-Based Economy Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Powerful Tools for a Modern Knowledge-Based Economy at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Powerful Tools for a Modern Knowledge-Based Economy Pocket Guide.

We use dummy variables indicating larger regions in both countries. Here we present the regression results computed separately in the two countries. The dependent variable is the entrepreneurship rate as defined as the number of start-ups per 1, employees in a region. All independent variables and control variables with the exception of the binary regional controls were z-standardized to avoid multicollinearity. OLS-regression is the standard analytic method in regional entrepreneurship research, e.

The places MSAs and LADs differ in their population sizes resulting in fewer individual observations from less populated regions in the personality datasets. An unwelcome side effect of these size differences is that the average regional scores of the Big Five traits from which we compute the entrepreneurial-culture indicator are based on different number of participating individuals see for details on this Section 1.

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Therefore, all regressions are weighted by the number of respondents per region in the personality data set; this procedure gives greater weight to regions with more observations and thus a more precise measurement of the regional traits [ 60 ]. All regressions are weighted by the number of respondents per region in the personality data set, cf. In the next step we test for the hypothesized interaction effects.

Consistent with predictions, in both countries the local entrepreneurship rate was highest when high human capital came together with an entrepreneurial culture Fig 1 and when high industrial diversity came together with an entrepreneurial culture Fig 2. In fact, the positive effects of human capital and industry diversity are substantially weaker or even vanish in regions where the entrepreneurial culture is weak. Fig 3 US and 4 GB compare maps of the entrepreneurship rates Figs 3A and 4A , of the interaction between human capital and entrepreneurial culture Figs 3B and 4B , and of the interaction between industry diversity and entrepreneurial culture Figs 3C and 4C.

The wealthiest region in the US, San Jose—home of Silicon Valley, not only exhibits relatively high entrepreneurship rates but also high levels in both knowledge human capital, industry diversity and entrepreneurial culture. In contrast, regions in the US and GB with a combination of low knowledge and a low entrepreneurial culture exhibit low entrepreneurship rates e. B Fig 3B middle : Interaction groups between human capital and entrepreneurial culture in US regions. C Fig 3C bottom : Interaction groups between industry diversity and entrepreneurial culture in US regions.

Fig 3B should be interpreted as follows: Both variables, human capital and the entrepreneurial culture were splitted at the median.

Edit This Favorite

Regions in bright have below median values in human capital and the entrepreneurial culture. Regions in light blue are above median in either human capital or the entrepreneurial culture. Regions in dark blue have above the median values in human capital and entrepreneurial culture. Fig 3C is interpreted in the same way as Fig 3B while interaction groups are created for the variables industry diversity and entrepreneurial culture. The shapefile underlying these maps was kindly provided US Census geography. It contains Ordnance Survey data. B Fig 4B middle : Interaction groups between human capital and entrepreneurial culture in GB regions.

C Fig 4C right : Interaction groups between industry diversity and entrepreneurial culture in GB regions. Fig 4B should be interpreted as follows: Both variables, human capital and the entrepreneurial culture were splitted at the median. Fig 4C is interpreted in the same way as Fig 4B while interaction groups are created for the variables industry diversity and entrepreneurial culture.

The shapefile underlying these maps was kindly provided ONS Geography.

Innovation and Entrepreneurship by Peter Drucker Audiobook

It contains Ordnance Survey data: Crown copyright and database right In GB these differences are even more pronounced. We conducted a series of nine robustness checks that consider a alternative personality-based measures of the local culture, b alternative spatial levels, c migration patterns, d representativeness issues regarding age and gender, and e alternative explanations of the findings e. Taken together, these additional tests provide a remarkably consistent picture that supports the statistical validity and robustness of our main findings i.

Although the start-up rate is a widely used and accepted indicator for general entrepreneurial activity [ 21 , 68 ]. An alternative measure focuses on high-impact firms [ 70 ], which has generally been measured as enterprises with exceptional growth [ 97 ]. For example, Henreckson and Sanandaji [ 71 ] use the presence of billionaire entrepreneurs in a cross-country analysis of entrepreneurial activity. For our within-country analyses we use a conceptually related measure: the fastest-growing US firms as listed by Fortune Magazine [ 72 ] and a comparable list of firms with the fastest growth published by the Sunday Times and Virgin for GB Fast Track These additional analyses of firms with exceptional growth underscore the statistical robustness of the knowledge-culture interaction effect, even when considering an alternative measure of entrepreneurship.

Our analyses, which were undertaken in two independent samples in the US and GB , attempted to bridge the two disparate disciplines of economics and psychology by testing the statistical interaction between knowledge and culture in regional entrepreneurship rates.

Our correlational data do not permit causal conclusions but they nonetheless revealed a robust and consistent statistical interaction, one which is consistent with theory and research on the psychological characteristics of entrepreneurs. Moreover, the effect survived a wide variety of robustness checks.

Read Innovation Policy in the Knowledge-Based Economy (Economics of Science Technology and

Hence, even these correlational results can provide candidates to be tested in future research. Our results have several limitations. First, they are based on correlational data and cannot deliver strictly causal evidence. Second, we investigate only two knowledge resources, human capital and diversity of industries, and future studies could consider other measures of knowledge creation e. Third, our study investigates two Western innovation-driven economies. It is unclear whether our results also apply to other economies that are not primarily innovation-driven.

We hypothesize that neither knowledge creation nor the local culture alone are responsible for the entrepreneurial vitality, and subsequent economic prosperity, of a region. Rather, the success of a region in the contemporary globalized, innovation-driven economy may depend on the interplay between culture and knowledge creation. We further hypothesize that this culture-based perspective implies that a substantial amount of existing new knowledge—the potential for economic prosperity—in regions with lower levels of entrepreneurial culture may remain unexploited.

If so, then an entrepreneurial culture might be regarded as a boundary condition for the relationship between knowledge and entrepreneurship. The authors are grateful to Valeriya Mikhaylova and Patrick Schratz for their research assistance. Financial support by the Fritz-Thyssen-Stiftung Az.

Analyzed the data: MO MS.


  • An Invitation to Hypoelliptic Operators and Hörmanders Vector Fields?
  • Q&A. How Can You Teach Innovation and Entrepreneurship?!
  • Call for Papers - Elsevier?
  • Biopolitics and the Obesity Epidemic: Governing Bodies (Routledge Studies in Health and Social Welfare);
  • The Lives of the Caesars. Volume 1. Julius. Augustus. Tiberius. Gaius. Caligula (Loeb Classical Library No. 31)!
  • Entrepreneurship - Wikipedia.

Browse Subject Areas? Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. Abstract In recent years, modern economies have shifted away from being based on physical capital and towards being based on new knowledge e. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Data Availability: The psychological data are from the Gosling-Potter Internet Project and BBC-LAB UK - The PI's in these projects can be contacted to gather these data e.

Introduction Successful and highly performing local economies generally have one thing in common—strong and robust entrepreneurial activity [ 1 , 2 ]. Methods By means of the correlational data we utilize it is possible to determine the degree to which the interaction between knowledge and entrepreneurial culture statistically predicts regional entrepreneurship rates. Entrepreneurial Culture Entrepreneurial Personality Profile In recent years, very big data sets have established the existence of robust regional variation in psychological characteristics; for example, characteristics such as personality and values differ systematically across regions within countries and covary predictably with the economic, social, and institutional parameters of a region [ 18 , 19 ].

Knowledge Resources The economics literature points to two key features of knowledge resources—human capital and industrial structure. Control Variables Beside knowledge and entrepreneurial culture, other regional characteristics can influence entrepreneurial activity. Results Here we present the regression results computed separately in the two countries.

Download: PPT. Table 1. Start-up rate, human capital, industry diversity, entrepreneurial culture, and interactions. Fig 1. Fig 2. Fig 3. Fig 4. Discussion Our analyses, which were undertaken in two independent samples in the US and GB , attempted to bridge the two disparate disciplines of economics and psychology by testing the statistical interaction between knowledge and culture in regional entrepreneurship rates. Supporting Information. S1 Information. References 1. Saxenian A. Regional Advantage.

Cambridge: Harvard University Press: Florida R. The Rise of the Creative Class. New York: Basic Books: Clusters of entrepreneurship.

Hanadi Al Mubaraki Ali Muhammad Michael Busler - AbeBooks

J Urban Econ. View Article Google Scholar 4. Rev Econ and Stat. View Article Google Scholar 5. Sternberg R. Regional dimensions of entrepreneurship. Found Trends Entrep. View Article Google Scholar 6. Fritsch M, Storey DJ. Entrepreneurship in a regional context: historical roots, recent developments and future challenges. Reg Stud. View Article Google Scholar 7.

The economic benefits and costs of entrepreneurship: a review of the research. Foundations and Trends in Entrepreneurship. View Article Google Scholar 8. Fritsch M, Wyrwich M. The long persistence of regional levels of entrepreneurship: Germany, —, Reg Stud. View Article Google Scholar 9. Gartner WB. Journal of Business Venturing. View Article Google Scholar Shane S, Venkataraman S. The promise of entrepreneurship as a field of research. Academy of Management Review.

The future of Entrepreneurship research. Lerner J. Princeton University Press; Entrepreneurship and Economic Growth. New York: Oxford University Press; Audretsch DB, Keilbach M. Resolving the knowledge paradox: Knowledge-spillover entrepreneurship and economic growth.


  • John Updike - American Writers 79: University of Minnesota Pamphlets on American Writers;
  • The Cambridge History of the English Language, Vol. 4: 1776-1997 (Volume 4).
  • Medical and Care Compunetics 4 (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics).

Res Policy. Oishi S, Graham J. Social ecology: Lost and found in psychological science. Perspect Psychol Sci. Rentfrow PJ.

A theory of the emergence, persistence, and expression of geographic variation in psychological characteristics. J Pers Soc Psychol. Audretsch DB. Entrepreneurship capital and economic growth. Oxf Rev Econ Pol. Andersson M, Koster S. Sources of persistence in regional start-up rates—evidence from Sweden.

J Econ Geogr. Regional social legitimacy of entrepreneurship: Implications for entrepreneurial intention and start-up behavior. Davidsson P, Wiklund H. Values, beliefs and regional variations in new firm formation rates. J Econ Psychol. Beugelsdijk S. Entrepreneurial culture, regional innovativeness and economic growth. J Evol Econ. Nunn N.

The Importance of History for Economic Development. Annu Rev Econom. The effect of regional entrepreneurship culture on economic development—Evidence for Germany. Jena Economic Research Papers: Davidsson P. Culture, structure and regional levels of entrepreneurship. Entrep Reg Dev. McClelland DC. The Achieving Society Princeton, D. Van Nostrand: Hofstede G. Thousand Oaks; Sage Publications: Schwartz SH, Sagiv L. Identifying culture specifics in the content and structure of values.

Browse more videos

J Cross Cult Psychol. Aggregate personality traits. National character does not reflect mean personality trait levels in 49 cultures. The Five-Factor theory of personality. Handbook of Personality. New York: Guilford: Personality and culture revisited: Linking traits and dimensions of culture.

Cross-Cult Res. Freytag A, Thurik R. The regional distribution and correlates of an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile in the United States, Germany and the United Kingdom: A socioecological perspective. Digman JM. Personality structure: Emergence of the five-factor model. Annu Rev Psychol. Geographic distribution of Big Five personality traits: Patterns and profiles of human self-description across 56 nations. A Five-Factor theory of personality.

Handbook of Personality: Theory and Research. New York: Guilford Press: The cultural construction of self and well-being: A tale of two cities. Pers Soc Psychol B. Persecution perpetuated: the medieval origins of anti-semitic violence in Nazi Germany. Q J Econ. Becker SO, Woessmann L. Was Weber wrong? A human capital theory of Protestant economic history. Acs ZJ, Mueller P. Employment effects of business dynamics: Mice, gazelles and elephants, Small Bus Econ.

Fritsch M, Mueller P. The persistence of regional new business formation activity over time—assessing the potential of policy promotion programs. The impact of new firm formation on regional development in the Netherlands. Small Bus Econ. Block J. Lives through times.

Berkeley, Bancroft; A holistic view of personality: A model revisited. Ann Rev Psychol. Schumpeter JA. The Theory of Economic Development. Cambridge: Harvard University Press; Sombart W. Der kapitalistische Unternehmer. Lazear EP. J Labor Econ. Personality development: Stability and change. Heritabilities of common and measure-specific components of the Big Five personality factors. J Res Pers. Genetics, the Big Five, and the tendency to be self-employed.

J Appl Psych. Ashraf Q, Galor O. The 'Out of Africa' hypothesis, human genetic diversity, and comparative economic development. Amer Econ Rev. Balanced skills among nascent entrepreneurs. Public business advice in the founding process: an empirical evaluation of subjective and economic effects, Environ Plan. Schmitt-Rodermund E. Pathways to successful entrepreneurship: Parenting, personality, entrepreneurial competence, and interests. J Voc Behav. Casson M. The entrepreneur: an economic theory. Shared mental models: ideologies and institutions.

Metzger G. Habitual Entrepreneurs in Germany. Jena, University of Jena: Landier A. Entrepreneurship and the stigma of failure. Working paper; Armington C. Statistics of U. Acs ZJ. Foundations of high impact entrepreneurship. Found Tren Entre Res. Audretsch DB, Fritsch M. The geography of firm births in Germany. Reg Stud, ; 28 4 : — Glaeser EL. Entrepreneurship and the city. Baumol WJ. The Microtheory of Innovative Entrepreneurship. Princeton: Princeton University Press: Henrekson M, Sanandaji T.

Small business activity does not measure entrepreneurship PNAS. Fortune Magazine. Fastest-Growing Accessed Sep 8. The Sunday Times. Fast Track Pardigm shift to the integrative Big Five taxonomy: History, measurement and conceptual issues. New York: Guilford Press: ; pp. Personality and the gender gap in self-employment: A multi-nation study. Cronbach L, Gleaser C. Assessing the similarity between profiles. Psychol Bull. Becker GS. Human Capital. New York: Columbia University Press: The assessment of NVQs.

Creativity and entrepreneurship: a regional analysis of new firm formation. Growth in cities. J Polit Econ. Industrial development in cities. Condition: New. Brand new book, sourced directly from publisher. Dispatch time is working days from our warehouse. Book will be sent in robust, secure packaging to ensure it reaches you securely.

More information about this seller Contact this seller 1. More information about this seller Contact this seller 2. About this Item: Springer, Condition: Brand New. In Stock. Seller Inventory x More information about this seller Contact this seller 3. Language: English. Brand new Book. In this book, Hanadi Mubarak, Ali Husain and Michael promote the concept of innovation incubators from a business-management perspective. The book provides a comprehensive roadmap for the development of new economies based on technology, as well as value added in technology transfer, innovation development and an entrepreneurial climate.

Many books on innovation and entrepreneurship take a theoretical approach, presenting a selection of examples that may not reflect reality. However, this compendium of innovation and entrepreneurship case studies is based on the practical experience of executives and managers regarding the undertaking of projects within their industry and company.