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I specifically read this in preparation for my visit to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum. And yes, it obviously enriched my experience. For anyone planning to visit Hiroshima I would make this an essential pre-visit read. The tone of the writing is fascinating. Extremely unemotional; a little detached even. Which, in itself, is a really curious window into the mind of the author. Interestingly, most of the anger for their plight seems to be reserved for the Japanese armed forces with very little animosity toward the United States. First 30min segment is filled with spoilers and foreword writer tries to explain things to you like you are five that what you must think of each situation that foreword writer picks from the actual book.

Book part it self is excellent listen. I had read a similar book but it was narrated by an European POV staying in Hiroshima on the day of the events. This gave more insight into a Native's emotions about the bomb, losing the war, the love for their Emperor, the distrust of their military, and the quick adaptation to the occupation forces. I enjoyed it. It was also entertaining to hear the narrator try to speak like old Saeki-san :. I just stumbled upon this book and I'm glad I did, what an interesting account from Hiroshima in the hours, days, weeks, months after the bomb was dropped.

I love reading first hand accounts of history like this, written in the moment and not done with a revisionist agenda, it's just a diary of the day to day happenings and news as it occurred. I only wish it covered more territory, in particular more about the occupation, etc. I skipped the intro as I just wanted to hear the actual diary so I have no idea if that's just a bunch of anti-nuke nonsense or not, but the actual diary itself is a great and very interesting read. I don't know Japanese so I have no idea if he pronounced things correctly or not, but it sounded good to my ear.

If you want the diary of a doctor in post-Hiroshima, this is as good as it gets. What did you love best about Hiroshima Diary? It made me think of Hiroshima differently. I only knew the story from the American side. The is the story from the Japenese side. It's a horrific tale and I'm unsure about the morality of dropping the atom bomb. I enjoyed the splendid narration by Robertson Dean. What did you like best about this story?

It told the truth of the event with superb narration. Which character — as performed by Robertson Dean — was your favorite? The good doctor who wrote the diary. Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry? No but it's still an emotional listen. Any additional comments? The horror, the horror! While doing research for my second novel, which is actually supposed to be quite uplifting, I stumbled onto "Hiroshima Diary," and I was hooked from the sample.

Bur through it all, the patients, the doctors, the visitors, all the survivors, for the most part have hope and heart. It's a truly extraordinary listen as these people strive to make do, strive to help each other, strive to bring some sense of cheer to some horrific days. A young girl whose entire body is burned but whose face is still beautiful is made to smile--that's seen as a miracle and part of a good day.

Supplies, however meager, being brought in, are part of a good day. Memories of peaches brought by somebody who survived the bomb are brought to mind, and are relished with gratitude. A breeze on a bitterly hot day, so wonderful. This is a graphic, graphic listen, not for the faint of heart, not for the young. But certainly for those who would like to learn a little more, feel a little more, love and appreciate their world a little more. And it did what Paul Ham's book didn't do: It made me shudder for my part in humankind From embarrassed patient to one of a few doctors when he gets on his feet, Dr.

You've heard the military tactics and you've know the horrendous stories that pull on your heart strings, but this is a unique insight into the human psyche. It is a day by day account showing an honest, human perspective coping with defeat and devastation. Gripping, well written, horrifying account of Hiroshima - its a must read.

Leaves you thinking about it, long after you have finished the book. By: Michihiko Hachiya MD. Narrated by: Robertson Dean. Length: 8 hrs and 53 mins. People who bought this also bought Noble Length: 24 hrs and 51 mins Original Recording Overall. Wild Seed By: Octavia E.


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Publisher's Summary The late Dr. Foreword by John W. Dower by the University of North Carolina Press. P Tantor. Critic Reviews "An extraordinary literary event. What members say Average Customer Ratings Overall. Amazon Reviews.

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Sort by:. Most Helpful Most Recent. Anonymous User A precious poignant "peace" of history. Katherine Stunning and heartbreaking I have always known the Western story of Hiroshima - how the bombing brought an end to the War, and our Diggers came home from their frightful Japanese prison camps. Matthew Skip the 30min intro. Eric It was also entertaining to hear the narrator try to speak like old Saeki-san : 2 of 2 people found this review helpful.

Rodney Interesting find I just stumbled upon this book and I'm glad I did, what an interesting account from Hiroshima in the hours, days, weeks, months after the bomb was dropped. Bill A Grim Masterpiece. Like most eyewitness accounts of this kind, one can only expect that. If we seem to seethe with indignity with Dr. While following his eyes, do we in some way follow our own inner eye at ourselves.

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This is the value such remembrances have to the historical record. As I said above, this work should not be read for the purposes of sensationalism. We only have to go to our movie theaters today to get million dollar sets to be blown up for the public's new arena addiction. This should be read in the way it was intended, as a human account, as apposed to a personal account. This is not documentation of the theoretical, it is the face of one man, driven to take care of his patients, deal with his own conflicts, and find a peace within a living hell, an unprecedented hell.

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Shelves: war , favourite , ww2 , books-withtoratings , review-liked , history , non-fiction , y , author-male , places. I looked out of the window, and contemplated the constant uncertainty that British weather tests me with. Particularly this year; the wettest for a century. Dr Hachiya, is not bitter, he does not rage, shout, or condemn. As a result, I found it increasingly difficult to lay this book aside and return to the present day. Though of a desperate sorrow, the pulse of a quiet, practical, serenity lives within and brings life to the pages of this book.

I experienced a certain light-heartedness I had not known for a long time. For the first time I sense that I have gained something of a deeper understanding of the terrible fear engendered by the Cuban Missile Crisis in , to a generation to whom the human and economic devastation wreaked by the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, was as yet within such unspeakably painfully recent living memory. Jan 21, Indi Martin rated it it was amazing Shelves: read-enjoyed.

This is a very difficult book for Americans, I think. It doesn't point any fingers of guilt, it is simply a journal, written as it happened, by a doctor who happened to be very close to the epicenter of the Hiroshima bomb. Lucky to survive at all, this journal is priceless for the descriptions of what ground zero actually looked like, the symptoms of radiation sickness before anyone knew what that was, exactly.

The confusion following the bomb. From a medical standpoint which is largely what it This is a very difficult book for Americans, I think. From a medical standpoint which is largely what it is written in , it is brilliant and intriguing. From a human standpoint, it is devastating and difficult. This is, in my estimation, one of those books that everyone should read. Nov 13, Sara rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites.

A wonderful recollection of memories from one of the worst moments for mankind. A part of history we shouldn't forget, and must never repeat, told from within by the Director of a Hospital where many of the survivors later died due to the yet unknown effects of nuclear radiation. In spite of being a hospital's diary about such a terrible matter, the lecture is very entertaining, following the thoughts and investigations carried by all the workers and the few visitors that carried help and suppor A wonderful recollection of memories from one of the worst moments for mankind.

In spite of being a hospital's diary about such a terrible matter, the lecture is very entertaining, following the thoughts and investigations carried by all the workers and the few visitors that carried help and support, as well as some news from the rest of the world. A history of devastation and desperation that leaves the reader with the feeling that humans are good by nature despite of the facts , and that human beings can do awesome things, and face any situation, with the help of hope and other people.

A must-read for any kind of person. May 13, Nick rated it it was amazing Shelves: memoirs , wwii , japan , asia , apocalpyse , non-fiction. He then spent the next several months, a doctor, at the local hospital, triaging folks who in their shock from 3rd degree burns and the beginnings of radiation poisoning might have welcomed Voldemart or Peeta as a benevolent alternative.

Painful to read and unflinching in its description of the intersection of technology and the immense capacity of human suffering. The atomic bombing of hiroshima is part of the reason why today, young readers seek the literature of distopia for understanding. Feb 13, Lisa rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Peaceniks and history buffs.

Shelves: history-memoir-biography. Devastating first-hand account from a doctor of the immediate aftermath of a nuclear bomb. Gut-wrenching detail: " I discovered that I had tripped over a man's head. Excuse me! Excuse me, please!


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  • I cried hysterically! Not for the squeamish. This book, as some suggest, was not written as an anti-war manifesto. It's political messa Devastating first-hand account from a doctor of the immediate aftermath of a nuclear bomb. It's political message, if any, is subtle. As subtle as thousands of people slowly oozing bodily fluids from every pore can be, anyway. Oct 14, Michael Phelps rated it it was ok Recommends it for: Doctors who are interested in history. I understand that this book was a diary, not a novel. I understand it was written by a doctor, not a writer.

    I understand that it was hastily written in Japanese. I understand it was then translated into English by another doctor with the intent that the language would remain as close to literal translation as possible. I understand that to point out its numerous typos and punctuation errors is a lame thing to do. And I understand its subject matter is perhaps the most horrific example of Okay. And I understand its subject matter is perhaps the most horrific example of what humans have done to other humans.

    Therefore I can't rag too much on this book. I will simply say it is only moderately bad. View 1 comment. Aug 30, Greg McGee rated it it was amazing. Audiobook was free on the Hoopla app. Dec 24, Ellen rated it liked it Shelves: , academic-reading. While not an uplifting read, I think that this book is a cornerstone for anyone wanting to learn more about the real-life experience of World War 2. For anyone who lightly thinks about nuclear weapons or another full-scale war, this book promises to be a strong deterrent because of the descriptions of regular human suffering that it covers.

    The attack on Hiroshima hurt innocent people indiscriminately and after reading this book, it becomes highly questionable if the bomb was the right decision. I first read this book for a history class in college, and found it to be enlightening because throughout my secondary school education in the United States, there was only one perspective presented about Japan's role in World War 2.

    Here, we see from a primary source how one man encountered the destruction of his city and his responsibility for many who were injured in the aftermath. This book challenges commonly held perceptions about the Hiroshima bombing, and I believe that it is absolutely crucial for future politicians, military specialists, and diplomats to read.

    While not written in the most interesting language and often difficult to understand the medical terminology, this book takes a dedicated reader to really appreciate. Overall, I think that reading this book will inform my future visit to Hiroshima, Japan.

    Hiroshima Diary Livre audio | Michihiko Hachiya MD | iqegumybiwyf.ml

    Jul 30, Karen K - Ohio rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , memoir , world-war-ii. The daily diary of a Hiroshima doctor on the aftermath of the atomic bombing of the city. An unflinching look at the day to day efforts to survive. Though severely injured the doctor does his best to save lives and try to understand the ramifications of radiation.

    While I knew the Japanese worshipped their emperor I had no idea of the extent. Even rescuing a portrait of the emperor was looked upon as a great noble act. And that whenever it was moved there was a whole ritual to be performed. Even The daily diary of a Hiroshima doctor on the aftermath of the atomic bombing of the city. Even surrounded by dead and dying the doctor is brought to tears when worrying about what may befall his emperor after Japan surrendered.

    This one is difficult to give a star rating. No one should have to go through the types of experiences documented in this diary. I believe at least a portion of this should be required reading in any curriculum covering World War II. I don't think it's enough to just say two atomic bombs were dropped in Japan and then they surrendered—one should go furthe This one is difficult to give a star rating.

    I don't think it's enough to just say two atomic bombs were dropped in Japan and then they surrendered—one should go further to truly understand a little about what it meant for those bombs to drop. Jul 22, Barbara rated it it was amazing. Highly recommended. Mar 16, Anne rated it it was amazing. I loved this book. It covers an extremely difficult time in Japanese history, as the war draws to a close and American soldiers arrive on their beaches. Hachiya is also one of the doctors who first examined the effects of radiation sickness. May 23, Sam Motes rated it it was amazing. A haunting tell of death, destruction, striving for meaning, struggling for survival, weighing through rumor and truth made all the more chilling by the fact it documents true events around a historical event covered in a mere few pages in the average history book.

    It is definitely in the vein of Howard Zen's documentation of history through the eyes of the down trodden victim.

    The Incredible Resilience of Humans: Hiroshima Diary by Michihiko Hachiya

    Aug 21, Kathy rated it really liked it. I listened to this informative book I will be visiting Hiroshima next month. I wanted to have more knowledge of what life was like after the bombing. I felt that this book gave an accurate description. Jan 28, Jennifer rated it did not like it Shelves: memoir. Too depressing to even think about. I admit to skimming a lot by the end.

    Hiroshima Diary by Hachiya Michihiko

    There was not a single uplifting moment anywhere in the book - which, perhaps, is the point. There were many, many typos which were quite distracting. Feb 25, Amber rated it really liked it. A very well-done history, but it was just more of a horror situation than I could manage well. Horrifying, painful but interesting! Sep 15, Remy rated it it was amazing Shelves: ditched , history , wartime. Very vivid, extremely moving, but a little too much for me to handle emotionally right now. I'll probably check it out from the library again sometime in the future, but for now it's unfinished.

    Jul 12, Chris Banyas rated it it was amazing. Everyone should read this book. Feb 12, Sarah Crawford rated it really liked it. This is a book by a physician who was in Hiroshima when the atomic bomb was dropped. A great deal of the book deals with particular medical explanations of what was happening to those injured by the bomb. Some of it is sort of gruesome. Overall, it's a quite interesting first-person account of what happened during the bomb dropping and for a while afterwards.

    What I will cover is other remarks of his that are not necessarily medical in nature. The book starts out with a description of the va This is a book by a physician who was in Hiroshima when the atomic bomb was dropped. The book starts out with a description of the various persons named in the book, and then proceeds to his entry for August 6th, , the day the bomb was dropped.

    He was resting in his level room when the bomb went off and suffered some injuries, leaving him in somewhat of a daze. He got to the hospital where he worked and the people there cared for him. He described the survivors that he saw: He notes that the official reporting of the explosion claimed that the damage was slight, but he was able to see how they were being lied to, for the damage from the bomb and from the secondary fires was major.

    At first, with patients at the hospital suffering from diarrhea and vomiting, he thought that the bomb might have given off some kind of poison gas. He notes that, at night, there was no light, as all the electricity was off. Then he worried about an American invasion: On August 8th, he wrote that concrete buildings near the center of the city were still on fire, two days after the bomb was dropped. The Hiroshima fire department was not prepared for the type of explosion.

    The hospital also had a problem when some soldiers came in and demanded the give them bandages. Fortunately, later another soldier came in with a supply of bandages for the hospital. He also writes that patients were showing up with symptoms that the doctors weren't familiar with. The writer says that, of doctors in Hiroshima, 80 had been killed in the blast. August 14th: There was a conventional bombing run near Hiroshima. He also finds out that there will be an important radio broadcast the next day.

    This explains why the people of Japan had not spoken out strongly against the war, or protested, or did anything else. The Japanese secret police were very much like the Gestapo, and, if you did something they didn't like, you died or, at best, ended up in prison. The militarists also had total control of the radio and newspapers, so there was no way people could hear truthful information. So, anyhow, people assembled and heard the radio broadcast, and it was not about an invasion, but about the surrender of Japan. There were various elements that tried to get people to continue the war.

    The hospital staff, the doctor writes, were divided among those who thought that the surrender and real, and another group that thought it wasn't. September 15th: He writes that the Allied occupation forces have landed, and that people are putting fences around their houses and locks on their doors. Eventually soldiers visit the hospital and things go fairly well, even though there are troubles with translation. Sep 29, Claudette rated it it was amazing Shelves: japan , memoir-biography. Audiobook This was an amazing story about a medical doctor whom himself was injured by the atomic bomb that hit Hiroshima in , and his accounts of the patients he treated.

    He experienced first hand the effects the atomic bomb had on people and his diary reflects his attempts in understanding the conditions and injuries these people faced. He tried to fathom an understanding of the devastating effects of radiation. Apr 27, Abuela Linda rated it really liked it. This translated and published diary portrays an incredible on-the-spot account of the problems in post-bomb Hiroshima in the first two months after the atomic bomb was dropped.

    No one in the city who survived knew what it was or what happened. The author was a doctor who was badly injured, managed to crawl to the hospital near his home, was treated, and then spent all his waking moments and little sleep trying to diagnose and treat the injuries and radiation sickness. He kept meticulous record This translated and published diary portrays an incredible on-the-spot account of the problems in post-bomb Hiroshima in the first two months after the atomic bomb was dropped. He kept meticulous records on each patient and measured their distance from ground zero as well as their symptoms, how long they lived, etc.

    He finally did determine it was a type of radiation sickness. He also recorded the dismay when the Japanese surrendered, his hatred from then on of the military which really caused all the destruction, his love and veneration of the emperor and his country.


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    • He lost everything yet maintained an incredible optimism and joy in something as small as a fresh peach. Love of friends and support of friends is another major theme. It would have five stars except that, because it is a medical journal, it was more than a bit repetitive. He was a good writer and I am sure it would have been different had he known when he wrote it that it would be published.

      Excellent if not horrific account of something I hope no one else in the world ever has to witness. Oct 19, Matthew Turner rated it really liked it Shelves: listened-as-audiobook , non-fiction , translated , autobiography , japan , wwii. I specifically read this in preparation for my visit to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum. And yes, it obviously enriched my experience. For anyone planning to visit Hiroshima I would make this an essential pre-visit read.

      The tone of the writing is fascinating.