Manual The Magicians and Mrs. Quent

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There is no connecting to these characters because Mr. I realize that this story is set in a world modeled after Victorian England, but the characters are too busy talking around themselves to actually say anything. Oh, yes, the word magic is thrown about rather, they call it magick, because spelling it with a k somehow makes it more mystical and exotic, I assume , but with a title like The Magicians and Mrs. Quent one might expect to see actual magicians in the story. We get a hint that Mr. Rafferdy might possess some magical skill early on in a peek at the plot Mr. Beckett must have let slip out while his back was turned.

But nothing comes of that until somewhere around page four hundred. Half the time I was reading, I wondered if there really was magic at all in the story or if they were just referring to paltry parlor tricks. But if you want to call your story fantasy, you really ought to put more fantasy elements in it. Beckett, you are making science cry. I understand that, if this is supposed to be fantasy, the readers are supposed to suspend their belief on a number of points.

But there is no justification for Mr. One luminal can last for 30 hours, followed by an umberal of 6 hours, a lumenal of 8 hours, an umberal of 18 hours, and another lumenal of 4 hours. This is not possible because planets rotate at consistent speeds. And everyone on the planet would slam into the nearest wall.

Again, I get it: this is supposed to be fantasy though I think something like that is more of an ass-pull so that Mr. At least this story was a gothic romance. Sort of. Quent is divided into three parts. The middle part is, inexplicably, written in first person and may as well be a condensed version Jane Eyre with different names. By the end of the section, Ivy is married to Mr. Quent, and damned if Mr. Beckett has done anything to indicate why Ivy is so in love with the man. The first part of the book sets the reader up to think that Ivy will eventually fall in love with and marry Mr.

Rafferdy to be. But with Mr. Rafferdy, Ivy actually has something of a relationship. Rafferdy and Ivy are good for each other.

The Magicians and Mrs. Quent | Penguin Random House Canada

They have interesting conversations, they connect. Beckett goes out of his way to have other characters and Ivy herself remind the reader that Ivy and Mr. And this is still okay. Unfortunately, Mr. Beckett also sets Mr. But in the end, Mr. Rafferdy is engaged to another woman and Ivy ends up taking a job with Mr. This around page By the end of part two, Ivy is in love with Mr.

Quent, who is around his own home perhaps two hours every six months. They have maybe three conversations throughout part two. But the reader is supposed to accept that these two people who have scarcely talked and have little in common are in love. Sorry, Mr. Beckett, please try again. There are a lot of things Mr. Beckett did in his story that could have been good. They were simply handled poorly.

But Mr. Perhaps we should take Mr. Aug 04, Sarah rated it it was ok Shelves: fantasy. This was both a very good and very pedestrian book. The writing style was excellent - for fans of Jonathan Strange and Dr. But at the same time, there are just things that were done so very wrong that irk the reader the more the book goes on. For one, the title gives away some pretty big plot points that any reader with a decent This was both a very good and very pedestrian book.

Not only does this not add any sufficent depth to the plot - other then allowing certain characters longer to drink - but it also leads people to wonder things like "how the hell do the planets move, anyway? It would be understandable if the character was not ready to say it, but geesh, either may the character gay or don't. You are not freaking JK Rowling. And the multiple storylines was a bit insane.

And of course, they were all pulled together, in some very messy and highly implausible ways. Including one that would have involved a character completely forgetting everything - including a very traumatic event - in her life, up to the age of 3. Not at all. Just poof! So in the end, more then a bit disappointing, and it started out so promising. Nov 07, Trin rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy , historicalfiction , american-lit. Norrell …except really nothing like that at all. Beckett uses two of the most famous 19th century novels, Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre , as a jumping off point for an epic fantasy set in an alternate England in which magic is a common-enough aspiration for lords, but which cannot be or is forbidden to be?

There are some very cool ideas at play here—I love the eerie touch that in this world, days and nights vary wildly in length, leaving room for an extra allotment of time to spend cloaked in unpredictable darkness—but at times Beckett leans too heavily on the works he is paying tribute to. This is especially true in the middle, Bronte-inspired section; where in the earlier parts of the novel, the characters of Ivy and Rafferdy were clearly the Elizabeth and Darcy stand-ins, at least they had their own personalities and their own relationship that was allowed to develop naturally.

When Ivy travels to Heathcrest har. Get it? Rochester do. Nevertheless, the overall mystery—seriously, what is up with magic in this place? So I will definitely be picking up the sequel, first and foremost to find out what the hell is going on, but also because I genuinely like and care about what happens to the characters. Also, if Garritt does not turn out to be gay for his new actor friend, I will eat my hat. Or, not owning a hat, I will go out and buy one, then eat it. Oh man, I just finished this book, and I'm going to cry because I don't have the next one. I loved this book!

From the first page, where Ivy was walking with her nose in a book, all the way through, I was on a ride. I loved the historical-type setting, set in a country called Altania which has a lot of similarities to Britain, in a time-period similar to Regency or Victorian times. Ivy Lockwell, the main character is the eldest of three sisters, smart, logical, and of course, pretty.

Their fathe Oh man, I just finished this book, and I'm going to cry because I don't have the next one. Their father, who used to be a magician, seems to be senile. One night, Ivy sees some mysterious cloaked figures come to the door, and her mother turns them away. Well, that sparks a curiosity within Ivy, and she starts wondering what they want, if it has to do with her father's magick, and why he'd lost his mind. Along the way, she makes the acquaintance of two other major characters, Mr. Dashton Rafferdy, and his friend Mr. Eldyn Garrit. Some parts of the book focus on things the two men are doing.

Ivy sort of falls in love with Mr. Rafferdy, a feeling he reciprocates, but due to the differences in their social standings, a match just really isn't proper. After some upheavals in Ivy's home life, she goes to be governess to some children at the request of an old friend of her father's. This second part of the book is told in first person instead of third person like parts 1 and 3, but it didn't bother me at all. I liked having insights into what Ivy was thinking, and the first person perspective fit the gothic sort of feeling of part 2.

It is here she meets Mr. Alasdare Quent, her dark and mysterious employer. Here in Heathcrest Hall, Ivy deals with a grumpy housekeeper, a mysterious locked room, and children who swear they see a ghostly white lady outside on the moors calling to them. She learns of the Wyrdwood, the old forest that covered Altania before the Tharosians came and conquered the island. The Wyrdwood is dangerous, it seems to have a life and mind of it's own. What patches of it are left in the country are kept behind high stone walls. There's rumor of witches about. She also learns of traitors to the crown who are working to bring down the Assembly and introduce a new ruler, and she finds out Mr.

Quent is an inquirer for the crown. After having to rescue the children on a dark stormy night from being lured to the walls around the Wyrdwood, Mr. Quent decides it's safer if the children go live with other relatives. Thinking she's going to be sent back home, without the necessary funds to ensure her family's future, Ivy is quite surprised when Mr. Quent instead proposes marriage, which she accepts. After a dangerous scene with a gang of traitors aided by the witch, Ivy discovers she has some power of her own, being descended from the witches herself.

Quent decides it's safer for her back in the city with her family, and sends her off, while he heads to Torland on more work for the crown, helping out when the Wyrdwood decides to attack, introducing a big part of the plot that continues through the series, as the very land of Altania seems to rise up. The next part of the book goes back to the perspectives of Mr. Garrit, Mr. Rafferdy, and Ivy.

After returning to the city, Ivy finds out her father has been consigned to the insane asylum, a fate from which it seems she cannot rescue him from. Then, she is sent a missive from her husband to deliver a message to the lord he works for, who turns out to be none other than Mr. Rafferdy's father, throwing the two of the together again. Through another character who turns out not to be as benevolent as thought, Mr.

Rafferdy has discovered his own magickal powers, a skill that comes in handy in this last part of the book. Eldyn has discovered some powers of his own, although of a different sort, and in his parts, helps to take down a really bad dude. Or so I hope. This last section of the book was a fast read, I couldn't put it down. Things raced toward their conclusion, the action was much faster paced than the previous parts of the book, and it was just all-around exciting. The ending definitely leaves way for sequels, and I absolutely am going to get the next one.

I'm hoping I get some b-day money next month so I can go and get it. I just loved this book. It blended the historical kind of stuff I like with fantasy aspects, and a little tiny dash of romance. The characters were all excellent, I liked Ivy and her sisters, Mr. Rafferdy was great, especially once he started to take things more seriously. Eldyn's story I definitely want to know more of, and he's a character I'm rooting for.

Ah, and I can't forget Mr. All dark and brooding, and mysterious. I'm glad Ivy loves him, even if she still has some feelings for Rafferdy, it's plain she cares about Mr. Quent deeply. I can not wait to get the next one, and any others that may come after it. Jul 29, Inara rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: people who like gothic novels. Shelves: novels-magic , novels-fantasy-dark , novels-romance-gothic. Lockwell, once a magician has fallen ill, his mind is muddled after a spell has gone wrong, so Ivy, her mother and sisters are forced to take care of themselves and their father.

Ivy desperately wants to find a cure for her father, magic-induced illness could be healed by magic —thats her belief. But theres a catch — women cant be magicians, its forbidden by law a The three Lockwell sisters Ivy, Rose and Lily live with their parents at Whitward Street in the city of Invarel a reclusive life. When tragedy strikes Ivy leaves their home to work as a governess at Mr.

Heathcrest is located near the Wyrdwood, an ancient, magical and very dangerous wood and the home of strange creatures and — witches. Set in a fictional world with similarities to regency London and the history of England, enriched with magicians and strange happenings, it got more and more exciting with every page. Furthermore there is Mr. I liked Ivy, she is a strong and capable heroine with a sharp and logical mind — but just too much a little Miss Perfect sometimes.

The Magicians - Season 01 - All Hand Gestures

What is a minor fault in my opinion is the unfortunate choice of the title what reduces my rating to 4,5 stars. I was very intrigued by the plot and can recommend it to people who like to read "gothic" novels. May 10, Nicole Pramik rated it liked it Shelves: books-reviewed , fantasy , cover-likes. To be honest, it took me three readings not in a row to finally get into The Magicians and Mrs.

But it has some missing pieces that, had they been filled in, would have made the novel more enjoyable as a whole. First, I actually liked the way the story lines of Ivy, Raffredy, and Garrett intersected though it made it a bit of a stretch to keep track of at times. Along those lines though, the novel unfolds slowly, which may o To be honest, it took me three readings not in a row to finally get into The Magicians and Mrs.

Along those lines though, the novel unfolds slowly, which may or may not be a bad thing. The main characters, male and female alike, possess little to no flaws, so the good guys and gals remain good and never really have to make hard moral decisions and the bad guys are bad without any real justification for their behavior. Instead, it seems to be a social assumption. Personally, I would have liked some sort of exposition, however small, as to why Altanian society viewed magic as taboo for women.

Likewise, the magic itself is a bit low-key, so there is no wand-waving, spell-casting, or potion-making. But it does bring up the third missing element. Where did they come from? Who do they like to recruit? What was their mission? To be fair, The Magicians and Mrs. But since this novel serves as the opening act, I think more background details, at least in terms of setting up basic histories, were needed. As a whole, The Magicians and Mrs. Quent had much to offer but perhaps bites off a little more than it can chew.

From a writing standpoint, The Magicians and Mrs. Quent is eloquently composed. Though my one issue is the mid-section breakdown: for the first sixteen chapters or so, the story is told in third person. But maybe a little too much. But perhaps the literary inspirations influenced the novel too much though not to the extent that The Magicians and Mrs. Quent is a rip-off. Concerning content, language is nearly non-existent if there were any profanities, they were so infrequent that they were easy to overlook.

Regarding violence, while there are some tense moments where characters are threatened or in danger, there are no graphic, gory deaths or scenes of abuse or torture. Lastly, there is no sexual content. As a side note, some readers suspect Garrett is homosexual though, other than a scene where he cross-dresses in order to disguise himself, nothing stood out as very apparent to me regarding his sexual orientation.

Overall, The Magicians and Mrs. Quent is good but not great and borrows too heavily from its sources of inspiration at times. Likewise, its pacing can drag and some of the magical elements seem to be forgotten about at least as far as this first novel is concerned. But regardless where you fall within the spectrum, it takes a very patient reader to stick with it. Though I quite enjoyed it and will most definitely be reading the sequels , it does have some flaws The plot is complicated.

The women, meanwhile, are powerless to work magic at all Needless to say, having witchery in your blood is taboo. Throughout the novel we have these characters narrowly missing each other -- sometimes interacting, other times avoidant for society's reasons. In this they mimic the orbit of planets -- a major motif of the novel -- as each one wanders through their orbit, but gradually aligning as the plot thickens. The overall effect is patchworked. But consider that neither Austen nor Bronte was entirely successful in breaking their characters free of proscribed women's roles.

Why, then, the spews of hatred if the characters are interacting as in the originals? Who cares. Anyway -- an excellent book. The characters were enjoyable companions Ivy does tend to be Ms Ultra-Good-Heroine, but she has a sense of humor about it. The humorous quips actually made me smile No lizard people here, thank god. Jan 30, colleen the convivial curmudgeon rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-fantasy , romantic , dark-fantasy , whodunit , loved.

A bullet might be dodged by a stroke of luck. But you can't dodge a word. If one is flung at you, it will hit its mark unerringly. No, Garritt, there's nothing in the world more dangerous than talk. I didn't mind the weird change from third person omnicient, to first person particular, and back to third person - perhaps because I was aware of it beforehand. My biggest complaint was that Ivy seemed so different, in some ways, from the first to the second part - particularly in relation to Clarette.

Here is a fanciful girl, saying strange things, and Ivy gets angry with her for lying - but considering how patient she is with her sister Rose, it didn't really make a lot of sense to me. I suppose we are meant to take that the atmosphere of the house is affecting her, as we are told this many times, but it just seemed out of character. As others have said, I wish they would've developed the relationship between Ivy and Mr.

Quent some more not to mention not sort of giving away that particular plot point in the name of the title. I also wish we would've seen more of the sisters, particularly in the second part, which became impossible with the first person narrative. Not to mention the fact that it seemed really odd that after so much time is spent learning to like Mr. Quent, he's pretty much absent from the entire third half, except via a few letters and then at the end.

And, lastly, the bits with Eldyn and his sister, while sometimes interesting, seemed mostly fragmentary and not really tied into the rest of the story. I mean, I know it was, what with Westen's appearance and fate and how that effects the rest, but those parts just didn't grab my fancy, and I waited to get back to the others. Oh, and the weird varying lengths of days didn't bother me that much. Yes, it's scientifically impossible and didn't make any sense, but this being fantasy, I sort of just went with the "blame it on magic" and left it at that.

It's amazing what I can let go when I'm enjoying a story - a point which might irritate the hell out of me otherwise. Ah well I would say this book is more romance than magic, with the magic bits strewn throughout the first two parts only really coming together in the last, rushed part - but I got attached to the characters, and am interested in what will happen next, so I'll definitely be picking up the sequel.

Apr 09, SaraJean rated it really liked it. To the eternal dismay of my aunt, the future Mrs. Darcy, I simply cannot love Jane Austen as much as I should. I kind of enjoy Austen, but not having much training in Austen I under appreciate her sense of irony and am overly critical of the characters. Regardless of the reason, it makes life as a literature major hard and books like The Magicians and Mrs. Quent with its Austenian influences the kind of book I should not enjoy very much. Just to keep you on your toes, however, I love this book. I To the eternal dismay of my aunt, the future Mrs. Ivy, the main character, is utterly enjoyable.

She has faced hardship and comes through it still eminently selfless--but no so selfless you want to slap her. Her sisters, although rather flat characters, are sweet and sympathetic. Everyone knows someone like them. Quent is From the first time I met him I wondered about his motivations and finished the book with more questions about his motivations than at the beginning.

Characters in the subplots are not neglected and are drawn with a fine hand as well. The plot owes quite a bit to Jane Eyre. I had absolutely no problem with that as Jane is one of my favorite books. The parts that don't are incredibly interesting, taking rumours and tidbits of the strangest realms of human history and mixing them together into a delightfully disturbing soup.

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This book is not for the faint of heart looking for simply another book in the Austen tradition. I am interested to see if and how the various plot threads continue in the next books. I definitely feel like there were some loose ends that still need to be tied up. I finally figured out, by the way, why I like this book so much. Any regency historical fiction gets automatically lumped in the Austen-esque camp, but this owes at least as much to the Bronte's gothic tradition as it does to Jane Austen, and in a cage match, I think the Brontes would win.

It also brings to mind for me The Enchanted Chocolate Pot. Galen Beckett, do everyone a favor and call Patricia C. Jun 30, Siria rated it liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , fantasy , 21st-century , american-fiction. The Magicians and Mrs Quent is a fun but ultimately frustrating book, set in an alternate Regency England called "Altania"—I presume a portmanteau of "Alternate Britannia" where days and nights vary so wildly in length that you can only know how long tomorrow will be by consulting an almanac, the most ancient forests are dangerous and quasi-sentient, and where gentlemen study magic at university.

These interesting ideas, however, exist within a pastiche of classic literature—mostly Pride and P The Magicians and Mrs Quent is a fun but ultimately frustrating book, set in an alternate Regency England called "Altania"—I presume a portmanteau of "Alternate Britannia" where days and nights vary so wildly in length that you can only know how long tomorrow will be by consulting an almanac, the most ancient forests are dangerous and quasi-sentient, and where gentlemen study magic at university.

These interesting ideas, however, exist within a pastiche of classic literature—mostly Pride and Prejudice , Sense and Sensibility and Jane Eyre —so clumsily welded together that at times the book seems more shoddily derivative than an homage. Now, I know the obvious response to that is that this is a fantasy novel set in a fictional world, that it's not truly Regency England and perhaps here it's entirely usual for governesses to be sent out to purchase butter for a stately home, for women of the gentry to dress themselves stays and all, I presume , and for an unmarried man to sit in an unmarried woman's bedroom, amongst other things.

Yet in an alternate history novel like this, "our" world always serves as the foundational element, what helps us to make sense of what's going on in the alt-history work and appreciate the differences, and since Beckett's writing betrays no understanding of historical sensibilities, large chunks of the world-building fell flat for me. Combine this with some terrible pacing and jarring tonal shifts, and The Magicians and Mrs Quent is a mediocre-to-okay book that could have been really good if Beckett had had an editor wiling to be stern with him. I don't think that I'll be hunting out the sequel.

Jan 29, Julie rated it liked it. Actually, it is much more original than that sounds, and I confess, I didn't want to put it down, because I couldn't wait to see what happened next. But when I tried to re-tell the storyline, I started laughing because it was so clear where many of the elements could have come from. I would have given this 4 stars, If you took Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, Lord of the Rings, and Harry Potter and combined elements into one book and in that order, you would have this book.

I would have given this 4 stars, but I was really irritated at several of the conclusions for story lines. This book is long. It has more than pages, but there is a LOT of type per page. There are also lots of characters to keep track of. In the first part of the book, I almost gave up because there were so many new and unfamiliar names.

But I was very impressed with how the author tied all of the characters into one plot and conclusion. They weren't superfluous characters. Everyone played a role. I also liked the way the author combined Jane Austen type England and fantasy into an alternate world. My biggest complaint is probably the title because it gave away one of the major plot twists before you got there. One of the biggest positive surprises for me; starts a little slow moving between 3 characters and their environment, but then they start to come together and you figure out you are in a Pride and Prejudice with magic book; not so fast, since there is another turn and we move into Gothic and Jane Eyre with magic in the second part.

Then in the third and final part things come together and the main threads of the novel are resolved beautifully, though the larger issues just now start to impact o One of the biggest positive surprises for me; starts a little slow moving between 3 characters and their environment, but then they start to come together and you figure out you are in a Pride and Prejudice with magic book; not so fast, since there is another turn and we move into Gothic and Jane Eyre with magic in the second part.

Then in the third and final part things come together and the main threads of the novel are resolved beautifully, though the larger issues just now start to impact our characters. The only complaint I had is that the book is a bit unbalanced - starts with 3 main characters getting almost equal face time, but then it focuses on one of them, to come back to all 3 later - but that is usually an issue with many debut novels and no big deal. One of my top 5 fantasies published in for me, I am really looking forward to the second book. Jul 01, Kristen rated it really liked it. Quent is one of the most thoroughly engrossing novels I've read lately, though I did think it relied too much on characters not providing as much helpful information as they could have in order to control the plot or draw out mysteries.

However, the first thing I did after finishing it was order the next two books because I really want to know what happens next! Th The Magicians and Mrs. The first is a fantasy of manners reminiscent of Jane Austen with a focus on society, relationships, and class inequality. The next part is Gothic fantasy reminiscent of Jane Eyre told entirely from Ivy's first person perspective rather than following three different protagonists like the other parts, and the last has more in common with traditional high fantasy with magick and political focus.

Though the book follows three main protagonists, it's primarily Ivy's story and I loved reading about her most of all. I knew I was going to like her from the very first line: It was generally held knowledge among the people who lived on Whitward Street that the eldest of the three Miss Lockwells had a peculiar habit of reading while walking. In addition to being a reader, Ivy is clever, courageous, and determined--and I can't wait to continue her story in the next book!

Full Review on My Website Jul 18, Rebecca rated it it was amazing Shelves: read-in This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a Fantasy of Manners, set in Altania, a world that bears a striking resemblance to lateth century Britain -- except for how there's magic and witchcraft in the air. The first part of the book introduces most of the main characters, while unraveling a tale that owes a great deal to Pride and Prejudice , with just a dash of A Tale of Two Cities.

We meet Miss Ivy Lockwell, one of three sisters living in rather precarious circumstances, with little hope except to marry well. Their father is This is a Fantasy of Manners, set in Altania, a world that bears a striking resemblance to lateth century Britain -- except for how there's magic and witchcraft in the air. A curious advent is the arrival of a new heavenly body in the night sky, and there seems to be a connection to a riddle Ivy's father has given her, that hints of dark and dire matters.

Meanwhile, Mr. Dashton Rafferdy, a wealthy young gentleman of leisure, is lounging about at social gatherings where he is much esteemed for his quick wit. He believes himself content, and yet there are deeper matters troubling him -- vexing him, when he makes the acquaintance of a Mr. Bennick, a former magician who says Rafferdy himself is descended of one of the old houses, and the magic runs deep in him.

Rafferdy, much too sensible for all that old nonsense, dismisses the idea, and yet More pleasurably, he chances to make the acquaintance of Ivy, through a Mr. Wyble -- who is Ivy's cousin, and set to inherit the Lockwell home think Mr. Rafferdy is very taken with Ivy, and she with him, though both recognize it's impossible for them to be more than friends because they come from different social strata. Were this a straight out romance, they would find ways to overcome that, but this isn't a straight out romance, so things aren't quite that simple. Meanwhile, Rafferdy's friend, Eldin Garrett, a young man born into a grand family, but fallen on hard times, is scrambling to keep afloat with his sister, Sashie.

When we first meet them, they're staying at an inn where Eldin's greatest fear is keeping out of the way of the innkeeper's amorous daughter, and hoping that the revolutionary talk down at the coffee shop doesn't bring the Black Dog and White Lady down on them all and see them hanging from the gallows at Barrowgate. Things quickly take a turn for the worse, however, as a highwayman has singled Eldin out to be an agent of the revolutionaries, and Eldin soon finds himself in over his head, and running for his and Sashie's life Part Two is told from Ivy's 1st person POV, writing as if to her father, about the job she's taken to help out the family, and move them back to the old house on Durrow Street where he used to do his magic.

The job is as governess to two children, the wards of a Mr. Quent, who had been a friend of her father's. Lovecraft aspects becoming clear as well. The mystery and spookiness hinted at before starts to ratchet up now, especially with the introduction of the Wyrdwood, the ancient trees of Altania. Think trees can't be scary? Just wait until the passage where Ivy and the children are fighting to get free of the Wyrdwood and you'll change your mind. In Part Three, Ivy and Rafferdy find themselves allied in magic, working to solve the riddle her father gave her, and close the doorway it talks about -- whilst others, with a very different agenda, seek to stop them and throw that door open wide.

And if you know your Lovecraft, you know what that means. Since this is the first book in a series -- the second, The House on Durrow Street will be out next year, I suppose -- there's a touch of a cliffhanger ending, but it's a complete and satisfying read on its own, never fear, and I really can't recommend it enough.

Rowling -- gothic romance, gothic horror, magic, and mystery, I think you might love this book. Nov 19, Katie rated it it was ok. If goodreads had the option, I'd give this book 3. It was a very unusual book, for a number of reasons. Don't get me wrong - I enjoyed it, and at times was holding my breath waiting to happen, but at other times I was fed up because I knew exactly what was going to happen long before it did. This is because Galen Beckett a pen name has not only borrowed many characters from Jane Austen and Charlotte Bronte, but frequently lifted his characters dire If goodreads had the option, I'd give this book 3.

This is because Galen Beckett a pen name has not only borrowed many characters from Jane Austen and Charlotte Bronte, but frequently lifted his characters directly from the pages of those 19th-century authors' works, only changing their names and occasionally professions to "disguise" them. Most obvious are the lawyer Mr. Wyble read: Mr. Collins , who is the cousin of protagonist Ivy's mother, is always trying to ingratiate himself with those higher up than himself, is due to inherit Ivy's family's house when her mother dies, etc.

The other character who is scarcely altered from his 19th-century predecessor is Mr. Quent, who resembles Mr. Rochester of Jane Eyre in more ways than one can count: he lives in a large house on the moors, hires Ivy to be the governess for his niece and nephew, has a dark secret well, several dark secrets , which Ivy discovers behind a locked door on the upper floor of the house, used to be married, is 20 years Ivy's senior, etc. Other characters may not be quite as obvious parallels, but the fact that Ivy's family has three sisters of middling income but an old name and are thus outsiders to many circles of society again has clear parallels in Jane Austen's works.

For all that many of the characters and thus large portions of the plot are lifted directly from other sources, there are also some unique and creative elements to the fictional island nation of Altania three guesses what modern-day nation that represents. The story line with Eldyn Garritt and the highwayman Westen is less predictable and darker and thus more interesting than the plot lines revolving around Ivy and Dashton Rafferdy Garritt's friend and Ivy's one-time love.

The most interesting part of the book, however, is the fantastical element that Beckett has woven into the story. The idea of an ancient, and possibly evil, wood rising up against society becomes the driving force of the plot, and the fact that it's never fully clear whether the men who enter the woods come out as men or as dogs werewolves - though never explicitly stated in that wording is downright creepy.

The other unusual element of this book is its division into three sections. As a result, throughout the middle section when Ivy is off being a governess , the stories of Rafferdy and Garritt told in alternating chapters with Ivy's in the 1st and 3rd parts are left on hold, and one can only wonder what is happening to them. Overall, this book was a good diversion from doing school-related reading, and I mostly enjoyed it.

Shelves: recommend , fantasy , favorites , regency , read-in Quent is a fantasy pastiche of Austen and Bronte, with flourishes that seem inspired by Dickens and Lovecraft. That makes it sound like some kind of crazy patchwork quilt, but it is original and gripping. Invernal, Altania is a magical analog to London, Britain. It is a world where eleven planets circle the sky in patterns that cause days and nights of varying lengths that are impossible to keep track of without an almanac.

In class-bound, patriarchal Altania, magic is accepted historically but not deemed very relevant today. To quote the book on the state of the empire: "There was, in sum, an overall want of stability, a deficit of that most precious predictability upon which both civilization and business relied. In that setting the jewel of the story shines: Ivy, oldest of the three Lockwood sisters, seems to be the very essence of an Austenian heroine. Impoverished gentry, father mentally absent, by seeming accident she meets highborn Mr.

Rafferdy, who has spent most of his twenty-five years determined to avoid all seriousness. They are deeply attracted to one another, but society dictates that they can never acknowledge this. Then tragedy strikes,and Ivy, as all determined heroines do, seeks to save her family. This she does, oddly enough, by turning into Jane Eyre in all but name. In the Gothic second act of the book, Ivy is thrust into danger from rebels and witchery and the Wyrdwood and learns very unsettling things about herself.

In the bittersweet third act, Ivy returns to Invernal and the story resumes its Austenian pattern. Equally as engrossing is the story of Mr. Rafferdy's friend Mr. Garritt, which weaves a Dickensian thread through the book. The book comes to an end with villainy foiled and virtue triumphant -- for now. Until we arrive at the The House on Durrow Street.

Write quickly, Mr. Oct 18, Jamie Collins rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy. To begin with, it takes Regency London and transplants it, apparently, to a different solar system. This relocation has absolutely no relevance to the plot and I would complain about it more, except that I rather liked the conceit of having days and nights of varying lengths.

These characters must consult an almanac to determine if the sun will be up for seven hours or twenty-seven hours tomorrow. Other than this astronomical oddity, the setti 2. Other than this astronomical oddity, the setting is pretty much Regency London with the names of things changed. I think the book has some wonderful aspects and some may enjoy it more than others. It gets very bogged down with world-building, to the detriment of letting the characters breathe and the pages flow.

The book inexplicably changes POV in the middle and it seems like a whole different book entirely. I don't quite unders I hate to criticize this book, because I feel like it has a lot of merits. I don't quite understand it. I just think that the book wasn't focused enough on what it wanted to be. It's just too scattered in focus to really glom on and enjoy to it's fullest for me. I just hope more editing and clarity of characters come through more in the followup.

View 1 comment. Jan 14, Richard Derus rated it it was ok. Alternative history? Not really. Romance novel with fantasy trappings? What, then, is this little marvy? This is what would've happened if Fanny Trollope had lived in the 21st century. That, mes amis, Ain't Good At All. Shelves: fantasy , I fully admit that this "The Magicians and Mrs.

Quent" doesn't really deserve 4 stars. It's flawed, it's badly flawed. However, it really sucked me in and kept me turning pages to find out what happened next. It gave me a brief escape from my mundane existence. What more could one ask? What I really liked about "The Magicians and Mrs. Quent" was that it wasn't a typical epic-quest fantasy in a pseudo-medieval setting.

If you ever wonder what the pseudo-medieval world of the stereotypical fantasy I fully admit that this "The Magicians and Mrs. If you ever wonder what the pseudo-medieval world of the stereotypical fantasy novel would be like in a thousand years, this book answers that. Instead of drawing on our own Dark Ages, it draws on the Victorian era. Norrell , it is not the same. Altania is definitely not Earth. This story has no faeries or elves. I really liked the characters too. I wish Beckett had developed Ivy's sisters a bit more and had delved more into Ivy and Mr.

Quent's relationship. However, the characters and relationships she did develop were engaging. So, what are the flaws? This world was not believable. Apparently, it is part of a solar system and does travel around a sun. However, the length of the days and nights varies from day to day.

The only way Altanians know how many hours of day or night they're going to get is by consulting an almanac. How does that even work? Candles are extremely expensive, but that's what everyone uses for reading and other nighttime activities. However, they do have lamps also. They just rarely use them. Wouldn't it make more sense for them to use the lamps, which are safer and give off more light, than to worry about burning expensive candles?

The book is divided into three parts. The second part has a completely different tone and point of view than the first and third parts. It's jarring and doesn't really fit. According to other reviews, the first part is a direct rip-off of Pride and Prejudice , but I've never read Jane Austen, so I can't comment on that. The third part seemed vaguely Dickensian though.

My only issue was with the second part. It didn't offer any real twist on what Bronte and James had done before. Despite its flaws, "The Magicians and Mrs. Quent is a good read. It doesn't tax the brain too hard and it entertains. There is room for a sequel because there are questions that remain unanswered, but it pretty much wraps up the major plot lines. I'd recommend it to anyone who's looking for something different in light fantasy.

Jul 27, Mariel rated it did not like it Recommends it for: is there garlic on this pizza? Quent is a Frankenstein's monster of a mash-up not the monster mash where Frankenstein, Dracula and Wolf-man rocked out to kickin' tunes of Austen, Henry James and the sisters Bronte maybe a sprinkling or two of some others, just to cash in on the fanbases. Like a boy band personality generator covering all types.

Austen is the "cute one", Bronte the "dark one", James the "ugly" one If Galen M. Beckett had managed to capture even a little bit of what made those boo The Magicians and Mrs. Beckett had managed to capture even a little bit of what made those books great, instead of superficial Disney haunted house trappings, it would have been just readable. It's all over the place. I think the varied imitations were because he didn't know what he even wanted to do with his story.

Forget style, have a story to tell in the first place! Sadly, I wasn't even interested enough to be pissed off. I rewarded myself with a tasty snack for managing to finish it at all. I know that it's been a while, but I still feel the residual irritation whenever I spy this book displayed in book shops.

Tricksy fat hobbits. It's not what it says on the tin. I've noticed on goodreads that Beckett ghost wrote a 50 Cent novel under a pseudonym. Maybe they could make a sequel to the Ghost Writer, only 50 Cent comes after Beckett in righteous anger for having read his awful book The Magicians and Mrs. His review would go, "My fifty cents worth is that your book stinks. View all 4 comments. In case you haven't seen other reviews, or started the book yourself, one of Galen Beckett's strong influences for The Magicians and Mrs.

Quent is Jane Austen. Right from the first sentence the echoes of Miss Austen are blatant. The three sisters at the heart of the story are reminiscent in a way of the Bennet sisters — although sweet, mild Rose also resonates of Beth March. Then there is introduced Mr. Wyble, who was in another incarnation Mr. In case it wasn't obvious, from the back fl In case you haven't seen other reviews, or started the book yourself, one of Galen Beckett's strong influences for The Magicians and Mrs.

Bestselling Series

Galen Beckett Quent to answer that question While Ivy, our heroine, thinks the thought now and then through the book that women cannot perform magic, it seems to be contradicted often without any distinction being made between some kind of male-specific "magic" and female-specific "witchcraft".

Nothing is ever said to give any reason why Ivy "knows" that women can't be wizards. Is it their weak minds? Is it their small hands? Is magic precluded by pregnancy or their unmentionable lunar cycles? Is it literally impossible, or is it simply Not Done? It's never clear, to me at least — and I would think it would be something to be made clear in context. It helps that this is the first of at least three books, but I expected the beginning of a clue.

From the strong scent of Pride and Prejudice in the first section, the book proceeds to a heavy flavor of Jane Eyre in the second. When it becomes obvious that money is even shorter than she thought shades of Sense and Sensibility , Ivy goes as governess to two small wards of a taciturn, often absent man in a big, lonely, sparsely staffed house … Yes, of course Mr.

Rochester — which is a mild surprise, this introduction of a new Hero Prototype, considering that there was something of a Darcy equivalent Rafferdy in the first section, even though he turned out to be quite unsuitable to be the hero. He and Garritt were each a bit Darcy and a bit Bingley; they pooled the characteristics and redistributed them in a configuration different from Austen's gentlemen.

And Rafferdy got all the money. Layered over Jane Eyre is something more gothic. Having recently experienced The Turn of the Screw through Craftlit , I now know that's what it was — a truckload of it, in fact, lifted almost bodily from that book to this. In place of the two ghosts, though, there is one plus something else: the trees are dangerous and to be avoided, though no one explains why till it's almost too late.

Which seems so strange; Ivy is Not From Around Here, so I would think someone would take the clue that she has no idea about the trees and speak up before she did something stupid. About a third of the way through, the book undergoes a drastic change in format and scope as the point of view switches: from multiple third-person points of view following, for the most part, three characters — two of whom are always out and about and doing, to adhering to Ivy for a single first-person epistolary viewpoint, restrained to a large house or, occasionally, a small village.

It switches back again for the third part. For such extreme changes, the transitions were fairly smooth. It is rare in my experience for two main POV characters to disappear as Rafferdy and Garritt did the only comparison I can think of being LotR after the Breaking of the Fellowship , and it was frustrating for their storylines to be abruptly and unexpectedly lopped off — but there were enough and interesting enough events in the middle, and enough information provided for some of the many mysteries layering the book, that my interest was held.

Something which bothered me throughout the book was the wild variability of "lumenals" and "umbrals", this world's Latinish substitutes for "days" and "nights" though the word "day" was sometimes used as well. It didn't bother me nearly as much as some reviewers, from what I've seen; I saw one review whose writer was a bit incensed about the complete disregard of all laws of physics.

Honestly, that didn't trouble me so much, at first; this is a world with magic, so — well, there you go. But as I continued through the book, and the characters proceeded through nights and days which were long and short and middling with no discernible pattern, which they could predict only with an almanac … It became a distraction. How can they plan ahead? Are simple things like making an appointment with a dressmaker or to have coffee with a friend, or less simple things like travel, at all possible without an almanac? What if you can't afford one?

The week is not a unit of measure that is used, but the month is — so what exactly constitutes a month? Is it so many "days" each, I take it, being a lumenal followed by an umbral , or a set number of hours? Why is the world this way? I was going to ask why no one questions it, but if this is the way it has always been they wouldn't, I suppose; even the children might not wonder why today's period of daylight might be a couple of hours and tomorrow's a dozen or more, and then an eight-hour and then a twenty, since that would be all they had ever known.

But they have a working knowledge of planet rotation and orbit — Ivy's father's model of the solar system makes that a moot point. So shouldn't some of these vaunted scientists have answers? It is in a way like "women don't do magic" — it is the way things are, and no one asks why, even though it doesn't make much sense. I liked the book. I liked the sisters; I liked the mystery of Ivy's father's ailment and the house on Durrow Street. I liked the storylines for Rafferdy and Garritt — some of that surprised me, which is always good. I liked the idea of the debt owed to Victorian and Edwardian literature.

It was a certain lack in the writing that kept me at arm's length, and then there was this Quent : Ivy: "Know that I respect him, and admire him, and hold him in the highest esteem; that I love him. I cannot help but wonder how many quotes and near-quotes there are that I simply don't know my Austen and Bronte well enough to catch.

There are times when I enjoy a wink and a nod to an old favorite; I've done it myself in my own writing. But here I think the reason it irritated rather than amused was that throughout the whole book there were so many characters to whom I could point and identify their Austen or Bronte or James counterpart. This was more than a wink and a nod — this was more than pastiche or homage. This became, for me, a detraction from an otherwise enjoyable book.

Mar 31, Kat Hooper rated it liked it. Galen Beckett, Quent, Galen Beckett's "debut" novel. There's something exciting about a new author -- they're fresh, and when you hold one of their books in your hands especially a beautiful one like The Magicians and Mrs. Quent , you hope that maybe you're about to discover a brand new talent.

Imagine my disappointment when I turned over the title page and read that the copyright to The Magicians and Mrs. Quent belongs to Mark Anthony. I immediately went to both authors' websites. Galen Beckett's talked about his debut novel. Well, not to be too cagey, but that's something I can't answer quite yet. I can tell you that it's not another book in The Last Rune series--that tale, wonderful as it was for me, has come to a close. I can also tell you that the new book is a fantasy.

However, it's fairly different than my previous books. So different, in fact, that my publisher has decided to launch the book under a new pen name. And that's where all the cloak-and-dagger stuff comes in. I've been asked by my publisher not to publicly reveal my alter ego just yet, so as not to spoil the secret. The good news is that I will be able to talk more freely about the new book once it's out. So keep checking back. As soon as I'm at liberty to reveal my other writing identity, you'll see the news right here.

I won't summarize the plot for you, since the publisher's blurb above does that nicely. The first third of the book is almost a re-telling of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, in both style, plot, and character stereotypes. There are three sisters living with their batty mother in a low but genteel house which will transfer to their relative Mr Wyble when the mother dies. Ivy, the eldest, is bookish, intelligent, and rational. Rose is dreamy and strange. Lily is boy crazy and silly. Mr Wyble is a lawyer who is constantly trying to ingratiate himself with people who he thinks are better than him.

He says things such as: While my schedule would have permitted me to pay you a visit around the middle of the month, another opportunity was presented to me, which, I am sure once the particulars are heard, you must judge was the wisest investment of my time. Recently I had the good fortune to be of service to Lady Marsdel, a most noble personage of the highest degree. In her extreme -- dare I say, almost overpowering -- generosity, she invited me to an affair at her house in the New Quarter.

There I was happy to make the acquaintance of many remarkable and important persons. I've read that before -- it's Mr Collins. And In addition to these character and style similarities, there are plot borrowings, too: Ivy gets ill while visiting Lady Marsdel's Lady Catherine De Bourgh's house and has to stay for days to recover, Dashton Rafferdy Mr Darcy struggles with his feelings for Ivy Elizabeth Bennett but knows he can't marry her because of their difference in social status.

A local man accuses her of being a witch. There are strange things happening at the manor and Mr Quent and his housekeeper are keeping secrets and a secret room. I won't tell you the rest of it so that I won't spoil the plot in case you haven't read Jane Eyre or in case you missed the title of Mr Beckett's book.

Beckett's best drawn character, Eldyn Garritt, and his plot come from Charles Dickens. Beckett's writing style is not on par with his influencers, but it's very pleasant nonetheless. But much of his plot and his characters, though interesting, were not impressive because I've seen them all before. I understand that his purpose is to write pastiche, but I was hoping for something fresh. There are some engaging elements here, though: ancient patches of forest threaten to rise up and overtake Altania fantasy England , a group of men plot to overthrow the government and let in a new ruler it's not clear which side we should be on , the "Ashen" are some sort of aliens who want to suck out everyone's souls, unknown planets are appearing and aligning, Eldyn can wrap himself in shadows, and a mysterious stranger occasionally shows up to give Ivy a clue or encouragement but I never figured out why he didn't just give her the answers.

Perhaps most interesting is that in Ivy's world, days and nights vary in length so that she must consult an almanac if she wants to know how long the night will last alas, we're given no scientific explanation for that. But none of these fantastical elements seem to fit together -- it feels like they are some random interesting ideas that were thrown in in order to present a fantasy novel in a 19th century style.

The ending was wrapped up too quickly and conveniently without much explanation of how these pieces fit. Perhaps they'll all come together in the sequel, but for now I'm left confused. Mr Beckett can certainly write, and he's got this style down, but I'd like to see him do something original and meaningful -- something that doesn't leave me scratching my head.

The "social constraints" that Ivy faces seem to be the same constraints that Jane Bennett and Jane Eyre faced: pride and prejudice. Mar 18, Pandora rated it did not like it. It comes pretty close, but it does have some maybe two redeeming factors. The praise on the back cover is, in my opinion, highly undeserved and frankly misleading. This is hardly a fantasy, and the only bits of gothic romance I found were in the inexplicable second part of the story the book is divided into three parts.

This is probably due to Ga The Magicians and Mrs. The back of The Magicians and Mrs. Quent suggests that the story will about Ivy Lockwell and a job she takes working for a Mr. The first 18 pages are about Ivy, there is no mention of Mr. Chapter two introduces a whole slew of people who are completely removed from the characters the reader met in the previous chapter. The reader trusts that as the plot appears, the reason for these characters will be made clear. Some twenty pages later, the readers hits chapter three, is introduced to another set of characters, there is no plot in sight, and no way to connect anyone.

It was at that point I realized the back of the book had lied to me in regards to the story. But I kept reading, thinking it could get better. By the end of part one — the book is divided into three parts — there was only the barest hint of a plot. It was for that reason I tossed aside Twilight. By the one hundredth page, a reader should really have a solid idea of what the plot is.

He should be able to identify protagonists and antagonists, and he should be able to see a conflict. Hints of plot popped up throughout the book in disparagingly short bursts half a page here, two pages there but went unaddressed until the very end of the book. Things began unfolding in the last one hundred fifty pages that should have happened in the first fifty. Instead of introducing us to plot in the first three hundred pages of the book, Mr. Beckett wanders his way through the lives of his characters, leaving the reader to wonder why he should even care.

Usually, authors using third person omniscient will jump from character to character. Executed properly, the reader gets to connect with each character. There is no connecting to these characters because Mr.


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I realize that this story is set in a world modeled after Victorian England, but the characters are too busy talking around themselves to actually say anything. Oh, yes, the word magic is thrown about rather, they call it magick, because spelling it with a k somehow makes it more mystical and exotic, I assume , but with a title like The Magicians and Mrs. Quent one might expect to see actual magicians in the story.

We get a hint that Mr. Rafferdy might possess some magical skill early on in a peek at the plot Mr. Beckett must have let slip out while his back was turned. But nothing comes of that until somewhere around page four hundred. Half the time I was reading, I wondered if there really was magic at all in the story or if they were just referring to paltry parlor tricks. But if you want to call your story fantasy, you really ought to put more fantasy elements in it. Beckett, you are making science cry. I understand that, if this is supposed to be fantasy, the readers are supposed to suspend their belief on a number of points.

But there is no justification for Mr. One luminal can last for 30 hours, followed by an umberal of 6 hours, a lumenal of 8 hours, an umberal of 18 hours, and another lumenal of 4 hours. This is not possible because planets rotate at consistent speeds. And everyone on the planet would slam into the nearest wall. Again, I get it: this is supposed to be fantasy though I think something like that is more of an ass-pull so that Mr.

At least this story was a gothic romance. Sort of. Quent is divided into three parts. The middle part is, inexplicably, written in first person and may as well be a condensed version Jane Eyre with different names. By the end of the section, Ivy is married to Mr. Quent, and damned if Mr. Beckett has done anything to indicate why Ivy is so in love with the man. The first part of the book sets the reader up to think that Ivy will eventually fall in love with and marry Mr.

Rafferdy to be. But with Mr. Rafferdy, Ivy actually has something of a relationship. Rafferdy and Ivy are good for each other. They have interesting conversations, they connect. Beckett goes out of his way to have other characters and Ivy herself remind the reader that Ivy and Mr. And this is still okay. Unfortunately, Mr.

Beckett also sets Mr. But in the end, Mr. Rafferdy is engaged to another woman and Ivy ends up taking a job with Mr. This around page By the end of part two, Ivy is in love with Mr. Quent, who is around his own home perhaps two hours every six months. They have maybe three conversations throughout part two. But the reader is supposed to accept that these two people who have scarcely talked and have little in common are in love. Sorry, Mr. Beckett, please try again. There are a lot of things Mr. Beckett did in his story that could have been good.

They were simply handled poorly. But Mr. Perhaps we should take Mr. Aug 04, Sarah rated it it was ok Shelves: fantasy. This was both a very good and very pedestrian book. The writing style was excellent - for fans of Jonathan Strange and Dr. But at the same time, there are just things that were done so very wrong that irk the reader the more the book goes on.

For one, the title gives away some pretty big plot points that any reader with a decent This was both a very good and very pedestrian book. Not only does this not add any sufficent depth to the plot - other then allowing certain characters longer to drink - but it also leads people to wonder things like "how the hell do the planets move, anyway? It would be understandable if the character was not ready to say it, but geesh, either may the character gay or don't. You are not freaking JK Rowling. And the multiple storylines was a bit insane. And of course, they were all pulled together, in some very messy and highly implausible ways.

Including one that would have involved a character completely forgetting everything - including a very traumatic event - in her life, up to the age of 3. Not at all. Just poof! So in the end, more then a bit disappointing, and it started out so promising. Nov 07, Trin rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy , historicalfiction , american-lit.


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  • Norrell …except really nothing like that at all. Beckett uses two of the most famous 19th century novels, Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre , as a jumping off point for an epic fantasy set in an alternate England in which magic is a common-enough aspiration for lords, but which cannot be or is forbidden to be? There are some very cool ideas at play here—I love the eerie touch that in this world, days and nights vary wildly in length, leaving room for an extra allotment of time to spend cloaked in unpredictable darkness—but at times Beckett leans too heavily on the works he is paying tribute to.

    This is especially true in the middle, Bronte-inspired section; where in the earlier parts of the novel, the characters of Ivy and Rafferdy were clearly the Elizabeth and Darcy stand-ins, at least they had their own personalities and their own relationship that was allowed to develop naturally. When Ivy travels to Heathcrest har. Get it? Rochester do. Nevertheless, the overall mystery—seriously, what is up with magic in this place?

    So I will definitely be picking up the sequel, first and foremost to find out what the hell is going on, but also because I genuinely like and care about what happens to the characters. Also, if Garritt does not turn out to be gay for his new actor friend, I will eat my hat. Or, not owning a hat, I will go out and buy one, then eat it. Oh man, I just finished this book, and I'm going to cry because I don't have the next one. I loved this book! From the first page, where Ivy was walking with her nose in a book, all the way through, I was on a ride.

    I loved the historical-type setting, set in a country called Altania which has a lot of similarities to Britain, in a time-period similar to Regency or Victorian times. Ivy Lockwell, the main character is the eldest of three sisters, smart, logical, and of course, pretty. Their fathe Oh man, I just finished this book, and I'm going to cry because I don't have the next one. Their father, who used to be a magician, seems to be senile. One night, Ivy sees some mysterious cloaked figures come to the door, and her mother turns them away. Well, that sparks a curiosity within Ivy, and she starts wondering what they want, if it has to do with her father's magick, and why he'd lost his mind.

    Along the way, she makes the acquaintance of two other major characters, Mr. Dashton Rafferdy, and his friend Mr. Eldyn Garrit. Some parts of the book focus on things the two men are doing. Ivy sort of falls in love with Mr. Rafferdy, a feeling he reciprocates, but due to the differences in their social standings, a match just really isn't proper.

    After some upheavals in Ivy's home life, she goes to be governess to some children at the request of an old friend of her father's. This second part of the book is told in first person instead of third person like parts 1 and 3, but it didn't bother me at all. I liked having insights into what Ivy was thinking, and the first person perspective fit the gothic sort of feeling of part 2. It is here she meets Mr. Alasdare Quent, her dark and mysterious employer. Here in Heathcrest Hall, Ivy deals with a grumpy housekeeper, a mysterious locked room, and children who swear they see a ghostly white lady outside on the moors calling to them.

    She learns of the Wyrdwood, the old forest that covered Altania before the Tharosians came and conquered the island. The Wyrdwood is dangerous, it seems to have a life and mind of it's own. What patches of it are left in the country are kept behind high stone walls. There's rumor of witches about. She also learns of traitors to the crown who are working to bring down the Assembly and introduce a new ruler, and she finds out Mr. Quent is an inquirer for the crown. After having to rescue the children on a dark stormy night from being lured to the walls around the Wyrdwood, Mr.

    Quent decides it's safer if the children go live with other relatives. Thinking she's going to be sent back home, without the necessary funds to ensure her family's future, Ivy is quite surprised when Mr. Quent instead proposes marriage, which she accepts. After a dangerous scene with a gang of traitors aided by the witch, Ivy discovers she has some power of her own, being descended from the witches herself.

    Quent decides it's safer for her back in the city with her family, and sends her off, while he heads to Torland on more work for the crown, helping out when the Wyrdwood decides to attack, introducing a big part of the plot that continues through the series, as the very land of Altania seems to rise up. The next part of the book goes back to the perspectives of Mr. Garrit, Mr. Rafferdy, and Ivy. After returning to the city, Ivy finds out her father has been consigned to the insane asylum, a fate from which it seems she cannot rescue him from.

    Then, she is sent a missive from her husband to deliver a message to the lord he works for, who turns out to be none other than Mr. Rafferdy's father, throwing the two of the together again. Through another character who turns out not to be as benevolent as thought, Mr. Rafferdy has discovered his own magickal powers, a skill that comes in handy in this last part of the book. Eldyn has discovered some powers of his own, although of a different sort, and in his parts, helps to take down a really bad dude.

    Or so I hope. This last section of the book was a fast read, I couldn't put it down. Things raced toward their conclusion, the action was much faster paced than the previous parts of the book, and it was just all-around exciting. The ending definitely leaves way for sequels, and I absolutely am going to get the next one.

    I'm hoping I get some b-day money next month so I can go and get it. I just loved this book. It blended the historical kind of stuff I like with fantasy aspects, and a little tiny dash of romance.

    The Magicians and Mrs. Quent Series

    The characters were all excellent, I liked Ivy and her sisters, Mr. Rafferdy was great, especially once he started to take things more seriously. Eldyn's story I definitely want to know more of, and he's a character I'm rooting for. Ah, and I can't forget Mr. All dark and brooding, and mysterious. I'm glad Ivy loves him, even if she still has some feelings for Rafferdy, it's plain she cares about Mr. Quent deeply. I can not wait to get the next one, and any others that may come after it. Jul 29, Inara rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: people who like gothic novels.

    Shelves: novels-magic , novels-fantasy-dark , novels-romance-gothic. Lockwell, once a magician has fallen ill, his mind is muddled after a spell has gone wrong, so Ivy, her mother and sisters are forced to take care of themselves and their father. Ivy desperately wants to find a cure for her father, magic-induced illness could be healed by magic —thats her belief. But theres a catch — women cant be magicians, its forbidden by law a The three Lockwell sisters Ivy, Rose and Lily live with their parents at Whitward Street in the city of Invarel a reclusive life.

    When tragedy strikes Ivy leaves their home to work as a governess at Mr. Heathcrest is located near the Wyrdwood, an ancient, magical and very dangerous wood and the home of strange creatures and — witches. Set in a fictional world with similarities to regency London and the history of England, enriched with magicians and strange happenings, it got more and more exciting with every page. Furthermore there is Mr. I liked Ivy, she is a strong and capable heroine with a sharp and logical mind — but just too much a little Miss Perfect sometimes.

    What is a minor fault in my opinion is the unfortunate choice of the title what reduces my rating to 4,5 stars. I was very intrigued by the plot and can recommend it to people who like to read "gothic" novels. May 10, Nicole Pramik rated it liked it Shelves: books-reviewed , fantasy , cover-likes. To be honest, it took me three readings not in a row to finally get into The Magicians and Mrs. But it has some missing pieces that, had they been filled in, would have made the novel more enjoyable as a whole.

    First, I actually liked the way the story lines of Ivy, Raffredy, and Garrett intersected though it made it a bit of a stretch to keep track of at times. Along those lines though, the novel unfolds slowly, which may o To be honest, it took me three readings not in a row to finally get into The Magicians and Mrs. Along those lines though, the novel unfolds slowly, which may or may not be a bad thing.